Cereals 2013 offers arable opportunities

The International Milling Directory (IMD) is happy to say that it will be at Cereals 2013, the UK’s leading show for agricultural technology.

 

The International Milling Directory's publisher Perendale Publishers was present at Cereals 2012

IMD’s publisher Perendale was present at Cereals 2012

On 12th-13th June 26,000 visitors and 490 exhibitors will descend on Boothby Graffoe, near Lincoln, for business-to-business (b2b) opportunities, crop plots and live demonstrations, including ones in the natural habitat of the Syngenta Sprays and Sprayers Arena. With over 64 hectares of stands, visitors are sure to get a comprehensive rundown of the arable industry.

Hot topics on this year’s agenda include recovering from the awful weather hitting the UK in the last few months, driving business efficiencies and adapting to the challenges of Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reform.

Charles Blessley, Case IH‘s UK and Ireland marketing manager, expects it to be a good exhibition for machinery manufacturers.

“Cereals attracts progressive large-scale farmers and operators, so it provides the ideal venue to showcase our range of technically advanced machinery. Since last year’s event we have introduced a number of exciting new products which will be on display at Cereals 2013.”

Marketing manager at New Holland, Richard Spencer, believes Cereals 2013 is an “ideal platform” to discuss business with customers.

“The event attracts the key decision-makers in the arable sector. Cereals offers a great opportunity for visitors to talk through the options, and our technical staff look forward to showing what we can offer.”

Pesticide Sprays Aided by Tablet… and Smartphone

Pesticides now come in tablet form?

Now you should all know by now that we at IMD HQ consider ourselves to be at the forefront in using smartphone technology and apps… we even have our own in case you were wondering (PPLAPP). But when I read that U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have released two mobile apps, to make things easier for anyone who needs to adjust insecticide spray equipment, I had to read on.

The apps incorporate the latest science of spray technology, including “spray nozzle atomization” models developed by ARS at College Station and they can be used with a smartphone from a field or even the cabin of a small aircraft. Developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Bradley Fritz and Wesley “Clint” Hoffmann at the agency’s Areawide Pest Management Research Unit in Texas, the apps are designed to ensure that aerial and ground-based crews can hit targets and minimize pesticide drift by keying in specifics on the type of equipment and pesticide they are using.

ARS is USDA‘s principal intramural scientific research agency, and the research supports the USDA goal of promoting agricultural sustainability. With dozens of manufacturers producing dozens of different types of spray technology—each with its own nozzle type, flow rate, and pressure setting range—the equipment setup can get pretty complicated. Aerial sprayers also must factor in wind speed, air temperature, flight speed and humidity.

One app is designed for ground-based spraying for mosquitoes and other threats to public health. It

Wesley “Clint” Hoffman

covers 60 different sprayers made by 19 manufacturers. The user selects the appropriate sprayer and is guided through the process of selecting specific operational settings, such as the nozzle type, flow rate and spray pressure setting.

The other app, for aerial spraying, walks users through the process of adjusting nozzles and settings so pesticides are delivered at optimal droplet sizes. Droplet size is critical in aerial operations to ensure “on-target deposition” and minimize pesticide drift.

The apps are available online through the Apple iTunes App Store and the Google Play Android Marketplace by searching for “Aerial Sprays” for the aerial application app and “Vector Sprays” for the ground-based sprayer app.

Read more…

Never miss a beat with the Global-Milling News

Good morning/evening (dependent on where you are reading joining us from) to our valued readers. Today I would like to draw your attention to our exciting online news-portal that is gathering rapid momentum as well as international milling news.

The Global Milling News sources updates on events, products, company activities and just about any news related to the international milling industry using advanced techniques in news gathering from across the internet. You can even find links to our previous blogs there as well as articles by our associated publications such as Grain & Feed Milling Technology magazine or indeed the Global Miller.

Using the simple drop down menu on the left hand side you can also search for articles related to your specific area of interest using key words such as, Agriculture or Mills and even narrow your search down to key topics such as Soybean Harvest.

The Global-Milling News portal continuously hunts for news and is therefore always updating and it even organizes articles by their relevance and rating to save you the time and the trouble of wading through news that is irrelevant to you. This can be even more tailored to your needs simply by subscribing to the RSS feed where the news can be sent directly to you.

So don’t miss out and check it out now at www.global-milling.com.

Pssst… Just to let you know, you can even submit news to us here at Perendale where we will distribute and expose it across the cyber world. So why not give it a try and send us a press release at info@perendale.co.uk.

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UK Grains Harvest 2012: What we already knew…

The global price of wheat has increased by an astounding 30% over the past 12 months – which according to the UK based National Farmers Union (NFU), has put massive pressure on farmers who buy grain to feed their livestock.

NFU President Peter Kendal was discussing the worst wheat growth in the UK since the 1980’s when he said, “The challenge for the pig and poultry market is trying to make sure that retailers pay a fair price, because in pigs 50% of the cost is grain, poultry it’s 60% – and these farmers at the moment, because the prices haven’t responded yet, they’re actually saying I’m not going to fill my sheds with poultry or pigs any more.”

The problems faced by farmers in the UK and the global increase in wheat prices are both adding to fears over rises in food prices reports the BBC News wesbsite. But The extreme weather has taken its toll on the amount of food produced and the quality of food and grain.

Martyn Jones, from the Morrisons supermarket chain, said that, for example, carrots were not quite as sweet as previous years, and the available volumes of some food was down – about 25% across most potatoes and root crops.

The worst hit areas in the UK this summer were in the South-West where a huge proportion of  UK crops are produced. Ian Johnson, south-west England spokesman for the NFU, said this year’s weather had led to a “mixed picture” for arable farmers.

He said while wheat crops had suffered, winter barley yields were up 1.6%; spring barley yields were down 7.4% and oilseed rape yields were up 5.9%.

But still for some such as Paul Harris, an arable farmer in Dorset, the difficulties look set to continue. He said, “I’ve been farming now for 40 years and it’s the worst harvest I have ever known.”

More about NFU

UK Farmers A-Maized by Wet Weather

The weather strikes again this time with rain putting a dampener on the UK maize harvest according to experts. Farmers Weekly has reported that the harvesting schedule for most farmers across the UK has been put back by up to four weeks already, and the rain looks set to continue as autumn sets in.

It all seems a little too familiar t last year’s harvest where poor weather again affected harvesting in the UK, not to mention the severe and catastrophic drought across the Atlantic ocean. Richard Camplin of Limagrain UK said, “If we get warm, persistent weather it will give the cobs a chance to mature and for growers to harvest mid- to late October. However, if we get prolonged periods of rain in October, it could lead to problems getting machinery on the field.”

And continued, “”Two bad years for maize could lead those on the margins of growing maize to consider other things, such as whole-crop, but people shouldn’t be hasty if they are thinking about moving away from maize.”

It has been well documented that the trade price of maize, cereals and grains has been inflated as a result of the varying extremes in weather for 2012, but more-strict quality control means that farmers and millers have been under added pressure against the elements.

Neil Groom of Grainseed has described this ‘mixed-bag’ of crops as having lots of variation occurring even within fields. “We have seen a wide range of crops from normal to very poor, and that can be in the same fields.

He has also suggested that the heavy moisture has and will continue to enhance the risk of diseases and severe conditions in the fields, he said “Poor soil management has also been evident this year, whether due to compaction or inadequate drainage in the soil. The rain has also caused leaching of nitrogen, leaving the crops hungry in many cases.”

And continued,  “Eyespot has been an issue throughout the South West and West coast. If eyespot has moved on to your crop within the last week, get out there and put a fungicide on. It needs to be put on at least one month prior to harvest,” he said.

www.fwi.co.uk

USA News: Record Summer Puts a Dampener on Crop Conditions, Spelling Scorcher for Grains Market

The Midwestern region of the United States has experienced uncharacteristically hot weather in the last few weeks, which are a crucial time for crop farms. The region otherwise known as the Corn Belt has seen record temperatures reach over 105 Fahrenheit in recent weeks as reported by Reuters.

Drought conditions in the past week across the central United States have intensified, causing damage to crops in Missouri, Indiana and Southern Illinois. Some farmers are being forced into cutting stunted corn for silage, a low grade feed for cattle. The percentage of corn rated Good to Excellent dropped by 8% this week to just 40% and with the forecast of rain expected to miss the areas where it is most needed crop conditions look set stay at dangerously low levels.

The question now for corn crop is ‘just how low will stocks be?’, a stark contrast to initial expectations of a record harvest for 2012.

Corn prices closed at $6.72 per bushel and increased by 21.0% in June due to a substantial deterioration in crop conditions reports AGWeb.com. Fears of tight supplies have also left soybean prices higher, in June prices rose by around 13% just close at $15.13 per bushel.

Wheat stocks as of June 1, 2012 were estimated at 743 million bushels, a 14% decrease from a year prior leading to a 14.2% increase in price for this month at around $7.39 per bushel.

www.agweb.com

www.reuters.com

www.weather.gov