Chief to offer equipment rebates to growers of Enogen corn from Syngenta

MINNETONKA, Minn., U.S.A., July 16, 2015 – Syngenta today announced an agreement with Chief Agri/Industrial Division to provide Enogen corn growers rebates on grain bins and other equipment.

A growing demand for high ethanol-yielding grain is creating the potential for corn growers to increase their income per acre. Earlier this year, Syngenta introduced the Ethanol Grain Quality Solution (EGQS), an initiative that includes agronomic protocols and best practices specifically designed to contribute to higher yields, improved grain quality and more ethanol per bushel.

“Grain quality requires attention to detail,” said Roger Townsend, President of Chief Agri/Industrial Division. “The goal should be to minimize quality deterioration at each step of production and during postharvest. We look forward to working with Enogen growers to help them maximize grain quality and return on investment.”

Stiffened bins from Chief Agri/Industrial Division have long been used as an integral component of commercial grain-management systems. Now, they are available in sizes ideal for use on farms, offering all the features that have created the Chief reputation for superior strength, durability and ease of installation. Greater access to technology and expertise from Chief, a leader in grain-handling solutions, will enable Enogen growers to provide ethanol plants with more high-quality corn while helping to ensure the stewardship of Enogen grain.

“Corn is the single biggest input cost for an ethanol plant, and ethanol yield per bushel is one of the biggest drivers of plant profitability,” said Guy Hartwig, head of Enogen grain operations at Syngenta. “Increasingly, ethanol plants are seeking not just clean, dry corn with little or no damage and foreign material, but also grain with quality characteristics that can maximize ethanol production per bushel, including more accessible starch. Chief’s industry-leading grain-handling technology and best-in-class customer service will help Enogen growers maximize profitability, while helping to support the ethanol industry.”

Enogen growers are required to follow specific, yet simple stewardship guidelines to receive a 40-cents-per-bushel (on average) premium. These guidelines include planting non-Enogen border rows around an Enogen cornfield, cleaning out planters and combines, and dedicating bin space for all Enogen grain.

For more information about Enogen® corn enzyme technology, visit www.Enogen.net. Join the conversation online – connect with us at social.SyngentaUS.com.


To summarise:

• Enogen growers will receive rebates on grain bins and other equipment from Chief Agri/Industrial Division

• Chief technology, coupled with the Ethanol Grain Quality Solution, will help provide ethanol plants with more high-quality grain

• Rebates enable grower access to Chief grain bins and equipment to aid in fulfilling Enogen stewardship protocols


About Syngenta

Syngenta is one of the world’s leading companies with more than 28,000 employees in over 90 countries dedicated to our purpose: Bringing plant potential to life. Through world-class science, global reach and commitment to our customers, we help to increase crop productivity, protect the environment and improve health and quality of life. For more information about us, please go to www.syngenta.com.


 

About Chief Agri/Industrial

Chief Agri/Industrial Division originated in 1961 and has grown to offer a full line of grain and commodity storage, aeration and material handling products throughout the world. The success of our company is directly due to the strong relationships we have created with our customers. Listening to their needs has led to innovative products that help producers minimize storage costs, protect the quality of their product, and maximize the selling price of their commodities. For more information about us, please go to https://agri.chiefind.com/about-us/.

GEAPS Exchange 2015

The International Milling Directory is proud to be a media partner and exhibitor again at GEAPS Exchange 2015. Taking place in St. Louis, it is sure to be a great event in the heart of the mid-western region. International Milling Directory members such as Bühler Inc, MFS, 4B, Tapco, The Mathews Company, Seedburo, Brock, Chief Agri Industries and many more.

The February issue of Milling and Grain will include a GEAPS preview, with exclusive exhibitor products and more to help you at the event. Pass by our stand to find Mark, Martha, Darren and Tom at the event.

 

Exchange 2015

Exchange 2015

Oilseed Congress debut brings exclusive content on oilseed complex in Europe/MENA to Barcelona

DANVERS, Mass., USA– HighQuest Group will expand its oilseed conference offerings with the debut of the new Oilseed Congress Europe/MENA in Barcelona, Spain, on 9-10 February 2015 at the Hotel Arts. The event will provide exclusive content on the current state and outlook for the oilseed complex in Europe and the Middle East/North Africa and how global trends are likely to affect the sector.

This one-and-a-half day event is fashioned after the company’s successful U.S.-based Oilseed & Grain Trade Summit, which is now in its tenth year and is highly regarded for providing timely content and outstanding networking opportunities for participants operating across the oilseed and feed grains supply chain.

As with the U.S. event, the content for the Oilseed Congress has been tailored to address the needs of its audience, focusing on issues that have a direct impact on importers and exporters, merchandisers and traders, service providers, and primary processors and downstream consumption markets in feed, food, biodiesel and industrial applications. Unique challenges and opportunities facing those active in this sector in Europe and the MENA region will be addressed, including:

  • What factors will drive the trade of oilseeds and derivative products over in the next 12 months, primarily in Europe, but also in North and South America and Asia?
  • What trends are apparent in the quality level of oilseeds and their derivatives in the major origins?
  • What is the expected future competitiveness between different vegetable oils used in a range of applications (food, biodiesel and industrial) and how will this affect trade flows for vegetable oils?

The topics for day two of the conference include risk management strategies, freight market and trends, developments in trading rules and arbitration, and trade financing, including what kinds of innovative trade financing facilities are available in the European/MENA market today.

For more details, visit www.oilseedcongress.com.

Register for the event with a 10% discount using promo code: #3PR-OCE15. Also check out the agenda for the co-located Women in Agribusiness Summit Europe, which will provide insightful industry content, professional development skills and strategies for success for women across the agribusiness value chain.

 

Connect with us: on Twitter @oilseedandgrain, Facebook and LinkedIn.
________________________________________________________________________

HighQuest Group, headquartered in Danvers, Mass., USA is a globally recognized strategic advisory and industry conference company serving the food, agriculture and biofuels markets. www.highquestgroup.com.

 

CONTACTS:

In the U.S.

Michelle Pelletier Marshall
mmarshall@highquestpartners.com
+1.978.887.8800, x117
In Barcelona:

Claudia Vesquez Alarcon
claudia@origenalstory.com
Land line: +34 938 335 071 | Skype: Claudia_biz

BinMaster SmartBob AO Level Sensor receives Hazardous Location Certification

International Milling Directory member BinMaster has new certification ensuring safe practice in use where dust explosions may occur. This is great news for flour and feed millers looking to invest in extra monitoring products whilst upholding health and safety.

(Lincoln, Nebraska—November 18, 2014)  The BinMaster SmartBob AO level sensor with integrated 4-20 mA analog output has received hazardous location certification. It is listed for Class II, Groups E, F, & G and enclosure types NEMA 4X, 5 and 12, ensuring the sensor is safe to use in locations where combustible dust may be present. This continuous level sensor works like an automated tape measure, but eliminates the needs to climb bins for manual measurements to reduce risk in the workplace.

The SmartBob AO with built-in 4-20 mA output is designed for facilities that prefer an analog output for monitoring bin level measurement data. The programming interface and controls are built in to the SmartBob AO circuit board for easy programming. Since the SmartBob AO measurement data is sent directly to a PLC, it provides an alternative to using a console or software for accessing measurement levels.

 

BinMaster

BinMaster

A simple push-button user interface built into the SmartBob AO circuitry is used to configure the settings for each SmartBob AO sensor. To set up the SmartBob AO, the user opens the device to access the keypad and steps through a series of push-button settings to set the interval timer, units of measure, 4 mA and 20 mA drop distances, maximum drop distance, and the Relay 1 and 2 functions. Once setup is complete, measurement data is sent directly to a PLC, with all settings for the bin saved in the non-volatile memory of the SmartBob AO.

An interval timer setting initiates a measurement in pre-determined time intervals such as every two, four or eight hours. When a measurement is needed immediately, an external start input can be used to initiate a measurement on demand. Additionally, an override input feature can be used to turn the measurement feature off, disabling the measurement function. The override feature is useful when filling tanks to avoid covering the SmartBob probe with material or to stop measurements when a bin is undergoing maintenance or cleaning.

The SmartBob AO features two relays that are configurable by the user, unlike competitive products that only have one relay, making the SmartBob AO more flexible and providing more data to the end user. The user simply selects any two of four different relay options in any combination including measurement status (measurement in process), high level alarm, low level alarm or error alarm (sensor did not take a measurement). Other benefits of the SmartBob AO include the output of a 22 mA error signal if the SmartBob AO should encounter a “stuck top” or “stuck bottom” condition and a soft start feature that reduces wear on the motor.

Hayden Flour Mills wins Martha Stewart Contest and $10,000

Hayden Flour Mills, an Arizona upstart flour producer of heritage grains, will receive a major publicity push from living mogul Martha Stewart after her company announced Friday that the mill won a national contest focusing on artisanal goods.

The business was named one of 10 winners in the Martha Stewart American Made awards. It will win $10,000 along with exposure in Stewart’s magazine, Martha Stewart Living, as well as on her satellite radio channel and website. There is also an event in New York in early November.

Jeff Zimmerman started his company in 2010 with an idea, the rights to the historic name of the flour, but little else. Piece by piece, he assembled what he needed to create the kind of soft flour he grew up with in the farm country of North Dakota.

Zimmerman found seed specialists who had the kind of heritage wheat varieties that used to flourish in Arizona. He found farmers willing to plant them. He bought a massive stone mill and found a restaurateur, James Beard Award winner Chris Bianco, who had the space for him to house it.

His flour has been sold to several chefs and bakers. It is available on the shelves in a dozen Whole Foods Markets in the Phoenix area, Zimmerman said.

Wheat harvested in Queen Creek, Arizona on Friday, June 29, 2012. Jeff Zimmerman is growing heritage grains and selling them under the old Hayden Flour Mills brand.(Photo: Michael McNamara/The Republic)

Wheat harvested in Queen Creek, Arizona on Friday, June 29, 2012. Jeff Zimmerman is growing heritage grains and selling them under the old Hayden Flour Mills brand.(Photo: Michael McNamara/The Republic)

“The growth is faster than we can handle,” he said.

Zimmerman has moved his mill out of Bianco’s Phoenix bakery and sandwich shop, Pane Bianco, and into temporary quarters in Gilbert.

He is working with farmer Steve Sossaman to create a home for his mill close to some of the land where the wheat is grown. Zimmerman said it will cut trucking and production costs, and serve as a showcase for the milling process. He expects the operation to open in November.

Zimmerman said more farmers are interested in planting the ancient grain varietals. He started with Sossaman and two other farmers planting three varieties of wheat. He now has six farmers planting 14 types.

Zimmerman hopes the organic and heritage flour market can grow like the organic and heritage vegetable market. He is telling bakers they should buy their own mills, even though it would cut into his business, since he believes it will raise interest in the locally sourced wheat.

“A rising tide lifts all boats,” Zimmerman said. “We are close to leading the country with our grain movement.”

by Richard Ruelas, The Republic | azcentral.com 9:44 p.m. MST October 17, 2014

Kansas State University’s IGP Institute announces on-site and distance course offerings for professionals in the grain, flour and feed industries.

MANHATTAN, Kan. – “The challenge to feed a growing global population cannot be achieved without a steady and sustainable grain pipeline from the United States to the rest of the world,” says Dirk Maier, IGP Institute director. With that situation in mind, the IGP Institute team members have been busy making plans for 2015 and are excited to announce their new initiatives for the year ahead.

One of the new opportunities on the horizon is the expanded partnership between the IGP Institute and GEAPS (Grain Elevator Processing Society).

“In addition to coordinating distance trainings in grain handling, starting in January, we will also partner with GEAPS to offer online courses and a credential in grain-processing management,” says Mark Fowler, IGP Institute associate director. Expanding these courses to include processing trainings allows the two organizations to leverage the resources and networks for both organizations.

Along with that, in 2015, the IGP Institute is incorporating more blended-learning opportunities for its participants. Blended learning involves participants completing online training prior to coming to the IGP Institute for the hands-on education.
“By delivering the foundational knowledge through distance courses that allows us to spend the majority of the on-site time applying and demonstrating principles in the mill and labs,” Fowler says. He also says there is increased knowledge retention when material is shared with participants over a longer period of time.

“Distance courses allow students to get a theory and feel online. On-site courses are redeveloped to focus on the hands-on applications,” says Mark Fowler, IGP associate director. “We are changing; we are moving forward.”
One of the ways the organization is changing is to restructure some of its trainings for on-site courses. Two of the June courses have been renamed and refocused. The basic milling course is renamed to IGP-KSU Managing Mill Balance and Control. The advanced milling course is renamed to IGP-KSU Milling Practices to Improve Flour Quality.

“Our courses are three and a half days with the majority of the time applying the material hands-on,” Fowler says.

Another new growth opportunity is coming with an expanded offering in the feed manufacturing and grain management trainings. Plans are being made for more feed safety and feed management courses as well as activities related to grain quality management.

Finally, the IGP Institute continues to maintain its high quality grain marketing and risk management offerings. In addition, plans are underway for partnership trainings with the Northern Crops Institute both domestically and abroad.

To view the full schedules for on-site trainings and distance offerings, see below. For more information or to register for either platform, visit IGP online at www.grains.k-state.edu/IGP. For on-site training questions, contact the IGP program coordinator at telephone: +1 785-532-4070. For distance learning offering questions, contact the distance education coordinator at telephone: +1 785-532-4053.
For More Information Contact: Lisa Moser
IGP Marketing and Communications Coordinator
telephone: +1 785-477-4837; lmoser@ksu.edu.

_ _ _ _ _
2015 IGP Institute On-site Courses
January
IGP–KSU Grain Elevator Managers – Jan. 5–9
IGP–KSU Introduction to Flour Milling – Jan. 12–16
February
AFIA–KSU Advanced Pelleting
March
Buhler–KSU Expert Milling (English) – March 16–20
Buhler–KSU Expert Milling (Spanish) – March 23–27
IGP–NCI Singapore
April
IGP–KSU Grain Purchasing
NGFA–AFIA–KSU Establishing a HACCP for the Feed Industry
May
IGP–KSU Grain Elevators Managers – May 4–8
June
Buhler–KSU Executive Milling (English) – June 1–5
IGP–KSU Managing Mill Balance & Control – June 2–5
IGP–KSU Milling Practices to Improve Flour Quality – June 9–12
CANIMOLT – June 15–19
USW Nigerian Flour Milling – June 16–25
August
IGP–KSU Extrusion Processing: Technology and Commercialization – Aug. 10–14
Buhler–KSU Executive Milling (Spanish) – Aug. 10–14
IGP–KSU Risk Management
RAPCO Poultry
AFIA–KSU Advanced Feed Manufacturing on Maintenance
Buhler–KSU Flowsheet Technology (English) – Aug. 17–21
September
Buhler–KSU Flowsheet Technology (Spanish) – Sept. 14–18
IGP–KSU Feed Manufacturing
October
NGFA–AFIA–KSU Establishing a HACCP for the Feed Industry
IGP–KSU Bulk Solids Handling and Flow
AIBI–KSU Grain Milling and HACCP Workshop
November
RAPCO Feed
Buhler–KSU Executive Milling (English) – Nov. 9–13
IGP–KSU Pet Food 101
December
2015 KSU-GEAPS Distance Courses
Jan. 5–Feb. 6
Registration opens Nov. 17, closes Dec. 16
GEAPS 520 – Quality Grain Management (English and Spanish)
GEAPS 522 – FGIS Grain Inspection Orientation
GEAPS 554 – Equipment Maintenance I
GEAPS 550 – Materials Handling I
Feb. 9–March 13
Registration opens Jan. 5, closes Feb. 3
GEAPS 521 – Aeration System Design
GEAPS 530 – Quality Management Systems
GEAPS 542 – Electrical Safety
GEAPS 544 – Preventing Grain Dust Explosions
GEAPS 600 – Overview of Milling Principles (Processing)
March 16–April 17
Registration opens Feb. 2, closes March 10
GEAPS 500 – Intro to Grain Operations (English and Spanish)
GEAPS 555 – Advanced Equipment Maintenance
GEAPS 540 – Entry Level Safety – new
GEAPS 620 – Grain Receiving, Cleaning & Conditioning (Processing)
April 20–May 22
Registration opens March 16, closes April 14
GEAPS 525 – Management of Insect Pests
GEAPS 545 – Grain Entrapment
GEAPS 510 – Facilities Planning & Design I
May 25–June 26
Registration opens April 27, closes May 19
GEAPS 511 – Facilities Planning & Design II – new
GEAPS 541 – Developing an Effective Safety Culture
GEAPS 551 – Materials Handling II
Sept. 14–Oct. 16
Registration opens July 13, closes Sept. 1
GEAPS 524 – Grain Drying
GEAPS 540 – Entry Level Safety (English and Spanish)
Nov. 2–Dec. 4
Registration opens Sept. 14, closes Oct. 27
GEAPS 552 – Materials Handling III
GEAPS 501 – Management Basics
GEAPS 630 – Quality Control/Quality Assurance Practices in Flour Milling (Processing)
GEAPS XXX – The Grain Industry in Canada: Climate, Crops and People – new

118th IAOM Annual Conference and Expo

Darren Parris from the team here at Perendale headed to the IAOM annual conference recently . Between 19th and 23rd May, the worldwide community of millers, grain and feed professionals, manufacturers and service providers met in Omaha, Nebraska, USA for some truly great events, products and conferences. The International Milling Directory was there in force and three pictures highlight the role that hundreds of copies of the directory were distributed at the event.

We always enjoy the direct contact and place in the centre of the milling world, and look forward to next year’s event with the latest edition. If you wish to register or update your company in the directory, just head to www.internationalmilling.com and start your membership in our great international resource.

 

A table full of hundreds of International Milling Directories

A table full of hundreds of International Milling Directories

Melike Arikan from Alapala with the Alapala advert on the back cover of one International Milling Directories

Melike Arikan, Area Sales Manager, from Alapala with the Alapala advert on the back cover of an International Milling Directory

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Exhibition attendees take a copy of the International Milling Directory each as they enter the hall.

 

 

 

 

 

133.6kg/capita – Setting a global benchmark for feed production — Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert was invited to participate on the recent round of VIV Roadshows, speaking in Abuja, Nigeria at the beginning of January 2014 and more recently at the IPPE’s VIV Pig Production Summit USA. His topic was: ‘The role of a robust compound feed to meet the needs of a growing world population’ and based on survey results from Alltech’s feed survey showing world production in 2013 at 963 million tonnes. 

Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert

Looking at production statistics and population figures in isolation does not provide us with a clear view of where we have come from and where we are likely to end up in a world that is being challenged to feed itself adequately.

Static figures do not encourage us to address issues that are looming.
I’m of the view that information is knowledge, knowledge brings responsibility, and together provides us with influence and power to bring about change. If we ‘know’ we have a responsibility to ‘act’.

Nigeria represents one of the few countries on the planet that is adding substantially and significantly to its population base. In the next decade it is projected by the US Census Bureau to add 50 million people to its current 177 million population base and by 2050 challenge the USA for the third most populated country at just under 400 million people! It’s an issue that our industry, and the food industry in general – both in Nigeria and globally – will have to address.

Nigeria is just one example, an extreme one, of what is likely to happen in developing countries over the next 35 years.

However, there is good news for Africa. From the FAO, and surveying the first 12 years of the 21st century, Africa IS increasing its production of foodstuffs faster than anywhere else on the planet. The area being harvested is increasing at twice the rate of that of any other region while two regions – the Americas and Europe – show no increase in area harvested at all.

Product quality is also improving at the fastest rate in this region while yield increases are matching those being achieved in the America and Asia.

Click to expand
Nigeria population growth

While world food production growth is increasing on average at 2.1 percent per year, Africa is moving ahead at 3.5 percent – and Nigeria is in amongst the countries achieve these higher-than-average increases.

Food consumption per capita based on an index of 2004-06, shows Africa achieving the fastest and most sustained growth rising from 78kg/head to 117kg/head since 1992.

As we are addressing compound feed production it is interesting to see what is happening to the consumption of meat and eggs. Total food supply has doubled in that period to 1.4 million tonnes and per capita consumption of meat up from 7.4kg/head to almost 9kg/head.

That in fact, highlights the next point I wish to make. How can ‘meat’ supply double yet per head consumption rise by less than 20%? The answer is straightforward – population increase. And that is why grams/day consumption of ‘meat’ products (in protein and fat terms) has largely stagnated in Nigeria since 1997.

Click to expand
Nigeria population growth

By comparison world food supply has also shown a steady upward trend, increasing by almost 1/5th over a 20 year period.

However, in contrast to that, world per capita consumption has fallen from a high of 151kg on average to 146.5kg. No much you might think in terms of total weight, but the additional population over that period is having an impact and we are likely to see this downward trend continue.

And based on consumption per person, the supply of protein in our diets is showing a steady decline as well. On average we are consuming a gram less protein per person per day. Again not significant you might think, but highlights an ongoing tend that can only accelerate.

Fat consumption on the other hand remains relatively unchanged, at between 5.9-6g/head per day. Possibly reflecting the tremendous increase in palm production throughout Asia over recent decades.

Population pyramids

I want to show here how developing country populations are going to increase – again based on figures from the US Census Bureau. I have compared them to the country I live in – the UK – for comparison. You’ll notice that Nigeria has a wider population base compared to the UK (which given the total difference in numbers, is only natural). Also, the UK shows a ‘bulge’ in the 40-60 year olds groups due in part to the baby boomers following the Second World War. What is also evident is the increased number of people living longer in the UK than their counterparts in Nigeria.

As we move ahead through time – to 2030 – the Nigerian population base has widened by an additional 8-10 million births in the 0-4 age group (with a total of 38 million) while the shape of the pyramid remains the same; and with no more people living longer. In the UK on the other hand the population base has remained largely unchanged while even more people are living longer.

Click to expand
World food supply

Finally, by 2050, the year in which it’s calculated the world will reach 9.5 billion people on the planet, and before stabalising at around 10 billion for the remainder of the century, Nigeria, while maintaining its pyramid shape, will once more see its population base expand, this time adding almost 70 million people in one-to-four year olds!  Again the UK is largely unchanged with a static population base.

These are in general the two key trends that differenciate between today’s developed countries and those ‘developing’.

Global feed production

I’m basing my comments on the latest Alltech Survey 2013 which provides output figures up until December 2013: the most comprehensive available for our industry worldwide and which we should be grateful to have.

The world currently manufacturers annually just under a billion metric tonnes of compounded or formulated animal feed. These feed statistics were collected by 600 Alltech staff from 130 countries involving 28,196 feedmills. Note: Numbers for less developed countries may be less accurate; but that will have little influence on overall dataset.

The top 10 countries in descending order of output are: China, USA, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, India, Russia, Japan, Germany and France which account for 611 million tonnes or two-thirds of world production.

Click to expand
global feed
production 2013

Poultry, which includes layers, broilers, turkeys and others, account for 444.4 million tonnes of feeds while pigs account for 242.8 million tonnes and ruminants – dairy, beef, calves and others – 195.6 million tonnes.

Key survey findings include:

  • China leading producer at 189 million tons
  • Asia leading overall region with 348 million
  • US and Brazil 2nd and 3rd largest countries
  • Africa fastest growing region; up 7%
  • Middle East has largest feed mills by annual production

Other key findings:

  • Poultry still the leading species
  • 46% of all feed is poultry feed, 61% of that is for broilers
  • 444.4 million tons fed to poultry worldwide
  • Aqua experienced fastest growth up 17% over 2012 – exceeded 40 million tons.
  • Pig feed production increased 11% (esp. China)
  • Pet food up slightly, Equine up 14%
  • Ruminant feed production declined 20%
  • Decline in both Beef and Dairy
  • Able to switch to forages when grain prices high
Click to expand
Global feed production 2013

The 16 important countries in terms of feed production are ranked in the bar chart above because I want to make the point that countries producing more feed do not necessarily have more feedmills. In fact, this chart is ranked by countries on the left with the least feed mills to the most on the right. And what is really interesting is that the average production from feedmills is not too dissimilar between countries and between regions at 30,000-60,000 tonnes per year.

A developing country’s prospects

Nigeria ranks 54 out of the 133 countries surveyed, in terms of total formulated feed production at 1.9 million tonnes (this does not include home-produced feeds or feeding straights or unformulated feeds). I’d like to extrapolate some figures from the information presented and raise a question or two for you to ponder.

  1. What are the populations of other countries producing a similar amount of feed to Nigeria?
  2. How much feed is being produced by those countries with similar populations?

The reason I ask these questions is that I believe there is a correlation between the volume of compound feed produced in a country and the ability of that country to feed its population adequately.

And I have identified a ‘benchmark’ that I believe all countries need to exceed in order to claim they are providing the nutritional requirements for their populations.

As FAO and other UN organisations, including their associated NGOs, demonstrate safe and affordable food supply is not the responsibility of those with commercial interests alone to fulfill; there is a need for governments to assume responsibility in ensuring food is produced in volumes that are safe and affordable for all.

Click to expand
Global feed production 2013

Here, I show Nigeria’s total population in 2014 alongside the volume in tonnes of its compound feed production (just under 2 million tonnes). I’ve compared that to other countries producing approximately two million tonnes of compound feed and show here the populations those countries feed.

If my proposal has any substance, then the people of Bosnia will be enjoying a healthy diet of livestock and fish products than their counterparts in Sweden or Czech Republic. Or they are enjoying healthier incomes from export sales.

When comparing Nigeria’s 177 million population of today with similarly populated countries we can compare their compound feed production; it is quickly evident that Nigeria is faring no better than Bangladesh and is a long way behind a country like Brazil.

For every Nigerian to enjoy the ‘world average’ supply of animal proteins based on compound feed, then the Nigerian Feed Industry has to rise to the challenge and lift production from 1.9 million tonnes to 23.6 million tonnes annually: over a 10-fold increase on what it is producing now.
Give our industry a chance

Click to expand
Top ten countries

I believe that scientifically-formulated compound feeds offer the solution to this world feeding itself adequately by 2050.

We not only have to meet the future needs of humans arriving on the planet, but we also have to meet the needs of those wanting to improve their diets as they become more economically advanced. On top of that we have to address the one billion people FAO tells us are receiving less food than is required to sustain themselves. That figure has not been diminishing, but increasing in recent years.

You may not believe that growing livestock and fish for protein is the way forward however, growing and consuming cereals and crops has not proven to be the complete answer either. Livestock and fish have many advantages in the production of protein for human consumption over grains and cereals (which we cannot go into here) and we should give this industry a chance to prove itself as it offers huge utilization and conversion efficiencies yet to be fully realized.

Unless we measure where we are we cannot set meaningful ‘benchmarks’ for ourselves or our industry for the future.

Alltech’s figures are the first comprehensive figures the industry has on just how much compounded feed is being produced and used. Based on these figures and our current world population, I put it to you that each country must set an annual benchmark that sees every citizen having access to food that is based on 133.6kg/head of scientifically-formulated compound feed.

After all, that’s the world average and every country should be striving to be equal to or rise above the average in terms of supplying safe and affordable food to its people.

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