Milling executives attend hands-on course at the International Grains Program.

One of IMD‘s biggest companies Buhler have hosted a hands on grains program. Mill owners, directors and managers from around the world traveled to the Inter- national Grains Program Nov. 5-9, 2012 for the Buhler-KSU Executive Milling short course. The course was held at Kansas State University’s International Grains Program and the Hal Ross Flour Mill where 15 participants experienced a hands-on learning opportunity.

The course was led by Tobias Naenny from the Buhler Training Center in Uzwil, Switzerland. Assisting him were two Department of Grain Science and Industry faculty members John Steinfort, Buhler adjunct instructor, and Shawn Thiele, milling operations manager.

In describing the course, Steinfort says, “The course is designed to educate milling executives and non-operation managers on all aspects of the milling process, which will help them to make better business and managerial decisions on a daily basis.”

One participant eager to learn was Luis Villaverde, director of Guatemala operations with Molinos Modernos. Villaverde was grateful for the experts who shared their expertise and the background of milling. He found the information useful as his company begins to expand their wheat mill.
“I was interested in the knowledge and being able to take advantage of the expertise from the people in the business. This course allowed me to better understand the business as a whole,” Villaverde says.

Luis Villaverde Mayo, Molinos Modernso, S.A., Guatemala; Jose Puig, Galletas Puig, Venezuela; and Carlos Puig, Galletas Puig, Venezuela, look at the equipment in the Hal Ross Flour Mill.

Throughout the week participants were in the classroom learning the basics of flour milling and then headed to the mill to apply those principals. From the Hal Ross Flour Mill to the Shellenberger Hall milling laboratory, they had the opportunity to put their skills to the test. These trainings allowed participants to learn about purifiers, milling machinery, proper cleaning procedures and the milling process.

“Going to the mill for workshops was very rich,” Villaverde says. “I have learned about the properties of the grain and the milling process from breaks all the way to getting the flour.”
Not only did the experts teach the participants, but the participants were able to network and learn from each other. Villaverde says he enjoyed exchanging ideas with other participants and seeing how their companies handled situations.

This is just one example of the many partnership trainings offered through IGP. In addition to flour milling and grain processing, IGP offers trainings in the areas of feed manufacturing and grain management, and grain marketing and risk management. For more information about training opportunities at IGP visit the IGP website.

Mycotoxin Contamination: Effects on Production

This week  iGrow’s SDSU Extension discusses the issues and solutions associated with mycotoxins during a seminar which is open to the public on November 7, 2012.

The seminar features Lon Witlow, a professor of dairy cattle nutrition in the Animal Science Department at North Carolina State University . Witlow’s seminar will address the problems associated with mycotoxins in feedstuffs and how it effects production and health of dairy cattle. He will also talk about feed additives that are effective in binding mycotoxins and how these additives reduce toxicity and milk residues.

At NCSU, Whitlow conducts research in dairy cattle nutrition and management, including the incidence, effects, control and treatment of mycotoxins. Within his research he has shown that mycotoxins routinely occur in a variety of feedstuffs, including silages.

The seminar is due to commence at 3pm and runs until 5pm on the campus of South Dakota State University in the Alfred Dairy Science Hall, room 100. Witlow, is co-sponsored by SDSU Extension and Prince Agri Products, Inc.

For more information on the event and to learn more about iGrow, readers should visit igrow.org.

AgriTalk Unveils Big Plans for 2012

AgriTalk India-2012, India’s first biggest expo on agriculture will take place this year as part of a collaboration between Junagadh Agriculture University, Aatma Project and Infocom World both of whom are based in Rajkot, Gujarat. The expo is scheduled to be held for 23, 24, 25 & 26th December 2012 at Shashtri Maidan, Gujarat with the aim of the exhibition promoting agriculture entrepreneurship among farmers.

The organizers behind the event hope that AgriTalk India-2012 will serve as a platform for farmers, companies, producers, and service-providers to gather under a single roof to share knowledge, technology and innovations. Visitors and exhibitors will be given the chance to showcase their innovations and technology to potential buyers and establish new business contacts across the country at single venue, bringing the potential future of agriculture all under one roof.

You could also be exposed to new markets, agents and distributors some of whom will be making presentations and demonstrations, which you can do too.

Farmers are going to be honoured in different categories for their innovative and extraordinary work and contribution in their farming activity through various awards as part of the heralded Khedoot Awards.

This exhibition will attract visitors from Gujarat as well as from adjoining states like Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, and other parts of India which ranks second worldwide in farming output. With the country’s market growing at a rapid pace it could be time to  join AgriTalk India-2012 to make your agri-products and services known, build new partnerships and generate new business opportunities.

Our Activities:
•    Inauguration Ceremony
•    Khedoot Awards
•    Exhibition
•     Technical Sessions and seminars
•    FoodTech Fair

There is still time for exhibitors and visitors to register their attendance to be part of AgriTalk India-2012 simply by visiting www.agritalkindia.com, where you can also find information on accommodation, food and travel.

 

Mycotoxin Risk High in Cereal Supply

High humidity and wet weather in the UK could set a high risk of mycotoxins in cereals this year according to a warning from HGCA reports NFU.

Weather conditions for many regions last season were relatively dry and, in general, mycotoxin levels remained below the legal limits. However, farmers and producers are being encouraged to air on the side of caution of the European legislative limits for the most common mycotoxins in grain intended for human consumption and also for feed.

Extra vigilance will be required by everyone in the grain supply chain according to Senior Research Manager  Dr Simon Oxley. He said. “Record-breaking wet conditions during flowering could mean that the risk of mycotoxins is much higher than the past two years.”

He added, “Although using the risk assessment can help growers manage mycotoxin risk, significant risk factors, such as rainfall, cannot be controlled. This season, as mycotoxin risk is potentially high, it is particularly important for growers to ask what their end market requires.”

The total UK rainfall was 145.3mm – twice the average amount and the wettest since records began in 1910, and its sheer volume has been a concern. Talking about its effect Professor Simon Edwards of Harper Adams University College said, “This led to a ‘double whammy’ in terms of potential mycotoxin risk: the rain caused difficulty for some when applying T3 protectant ear sprays and wet humid conditions over the critical flowering period proved ideal for fusarium infection.”

Unfortunately July has also been wet but this recent spell of heat has provided some small hope for farmers across the country. However August is going to be as equally unpredictable according to the Met office with the south likely to see the most of whatever dry and bright weather there is.

www.global-milling.com

www.nfuonlie.com

www.hgca.com

www.metoffice.gov.uk