Christy Turner

Christy Turner debuts E R & F Turner’s new Flaking Mill at VICTAM

Christy Turner Ltd is re-launching its new high capacity E R & F Turner 600 Flaking Mill, re-engineered specifically for the animal feed market, at VICTAM, on stand no. G057.

As one of the most established manufacturers of flaking mills, E R & F Turner’s new 600 mill; designed to handle steam flaked, micronized and extruded grains, maize, wheat, barley, beans, peas and soya, takes the proven chassis and roll design of its 600 mill, already used extensively across the breakfast cereal industry, and simplifying it to meet the needs of the animal feed market. The new mill also offers a more hygienic flaking process and a newly restructured pricing tariff, enabling the purchase of a premium brand at various price breaks, dependent on the ancillary elements specified by the purchaser. Chris Jones, managing director of Christy Turner Ltd (which brings together E R & F Turner, Miracle Mills and Christy & Norris), comments: “The redevelopment of our 600 flaking mill provides real benefits to animal feed producers by offering a premier mill at a competitive market price and reinforces our position at the forefront of the industry.”

Benefits of the new 600 flaking mill include:

  •  High precision, rigid bearing arrangement, enabling the production of very fine flakes, if required
  •  Heavy duty construction
  • Chilled iron rolls – manufactured from high quality spun cast chilled iron, allowing for a long life and considerable number of regrinds
  • Pneumatically operated scrapers as standard
  • Common chassis supporting mill and motors is isolated from the surrounding structure on anti-vibration mounts
  •  Fully guarded rolls at all times, including when the covers are open
  •  Facility to insert sampling tray during flake production

The following upgrade options are also available:

  • Fine adjustment mechanism to enable in process roll gap adjustment, or fully automated plc control of roll gap via servo valves fitted to the hydraulic pressure assembly
  •  Integrated variable speed feed roll unit or standalone vibratory feeder
  •  Water cooled rolls

Chris Jones concludes: “We are proud to count many of the world’s leading animal feed producers as clients, and our new 600 flaking mill further reinforces the reliability and quality craftsmanship for which E R & F Turner is renowned.”

 

About Christy Turner Ltd:

Christy Turner Ltd combines more than a century and a half of experience and innovation, the latest design tools, and sound engineering. Formed from five separate companies, each with its own individual expertise, Christy Turner’s worldwide reputation is based on the design, manufacture and supply of British engineered high quality flaking and hammer mills, pulverisers, grinders and associated plant.

Christy Turner machinery is used by international clients across many different industries and applications, including: the food industry, the animal feed industry, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, biomass processing, waste recycling, and mineral reduction.

www.christy-turner.com

Big new investment from İmaş Makine

International Milling Directory member, İmaş Makine and their Milleral products are pleased to announce that a groundbreaking ceremony has been held for the new factory, which will increase the capacity of İmaş two and a half times. İmaş Makine, offering its products with Milleral trademark, will put its new factory into use over an area of 56 thousand square metres with 20m TL (Turkish Lira) of investment. The company aims to increase turnover by three times in the medium term.

İmaş Makine, which is one of the İttifak Holding subsidiaries and a leading representative of the mill technologies sector, has broken the ground for their new factory on October 14, Tuesday at the 2nd Organized Industry Extension Area in Konya. Tuncay Lamcı, İmaş Makine General Manager, spoke on the groundbreaking ceremony and said: “Our current factory which has an area of 10,300 square metres will be extended approximately two and a half times and will be active over an area of 25,623 square metres. Seha Yapı, one of the group’s companies, will carry out the construction which we aim to finish in one year.”

Lamcı mentioned that the factory will be built with an infrastructure, which could provide the electric energy required by the company and in steel construction. He added, “Our company, who constructs turnkey grain milling factories and carries out important works in metal cutting sector, is on its way to become an intelligence company which could respond to all the needs of the sectors in which it provides service.”

 

Milleral

Milleral

LAMCI: “WE AIM TO INCREASE OUR TURNOVER THREEFOLD”

 

Lamcı mentioned that together with the new factory investment they aimed to achieve highest quality with lower costs and added: “We will establish a structure in our new factory, which has improvable integrated business processes, which supports the innovation; with working principles carrying more efficient, more advanced and more competitive qualities and which is ready for the needs the future would bring. In our new factory in which we can find the opportunity to try out our innovative and technologically value added products we produce, we will continue to design machinery and systems that are sustainable and that provide competitive power to our customers.

Lamcı stated that the new structure will remove the labor, place and time losses in the new factory and will meet the needs of social and educational needs of the employees. He also said that they aim to increase the turnover threefold by increasing export as parallel to growing production.

 

“WE BELIEVE THAT WE WILL SEE THE OUTCOME OF THE NEW INVESTMENT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE”

Lamcı stated that İmaş Makine was established as the second subsidiary of the İttifak Holding in order to be active in the milling sector in 1989 and in 1991, they added band saw machines to their activities and became active in these two sectors and added: “İmaş has become a global company today. Our has exported our goods up to more than 60 countries by carrying the technology from Central Asia to Middle East, from African Countries to Turkish Republics. Within this scope, we export nearly 96% of our milling machines and 17% of our band saw machines. The performance we have shown so far has encouraged us to grow. We believe that we will see the outcome of this as soon as possible.”

 

“WE ADD VALUE TO THE SECTOR”

 

Tuncay Lamcı has stated that as they have focused on three important issues in R&D and system design. Lamcı said: “We determine all the opportunities which will maximize the energy efficiency, system operation and long service life and then we present this philosophy which we call “Smart Milling” to use parallel to the interests of our customers.” He added that they see their products they have presented to global markets not just as machinery but systems which symbolize technology, quality and trust and that they would form an added value for the customers with this approach in the future.

 

___

See more at: http://www.gfmt.co.uk/imas

Hayden Flour Mills wins Martha Stewart Contest and $10,000

Hayden Flour Mills, an Arizona upstart flour producer of heritage grains, will receive a major publicity push from living mogul Martha Stewart after her company announced Friday that the mill won a national contest focusing on artisanal goods.

The business was named one of 10 winners in the Martha Stewart American Made awards. It will win $10,000 along with exposure in Stewart’s magazine, Martha Stewart Living, as well as on her satellite radio channel and website. There is also an event in New York in early November.

Jeff Zimmerman started his company in 2010 with an idea, the rights to the historic name of the flour, but little else. Piece by piece, he assembled what he needed to create the kind of soft flour he grew up with in the farm country of North Dakota.

Zimmerman found seed specialists who had the kind of heritage wheat varieties that used to flourish in Arizona. He found farmers willing to plant them. He bought a massive stone mill and found a restaurateur, James Beard Award winner Chris Bianco, who had the space for him to house it.

His flour has been sold to several chefs and bakers. It is available on the shelves in a dozen Whole Foods Markets in the Phoenix area, Zimmerman said.

Wheat harvested in Queen Creek, Arizona on Friday, June 29, 2012. Jeff Zimmerman is growing heritage grains and selling them under the old Hayden Flour Mills brand.(Photo: Michael McNamara/The Republic)

Wheat harvested in Queen Creek, Arizona on Friday, June 29, 2012. Jeff Zimmerman is growing heritage grains and selling them under the old Hayden Flour Mills brand.(Photo: Michael McNamara/The Republic)

“The growth is faster than we can handle,” he said.

Zimmerman has moved his mill out of Bianco’s Phoenix bakery and sandwich shop, Pane Bianco, and into temporary quarters in Gilbert.

He is working with farmer Steve Sossaman to create a home for his mill close to some of the land where the wheat is grown. Zimmerman said it will cut trucking and production costs, and serve as a showcase for the milling process. He expects the operation to open in November.

Zimmerman said more farmers are interested in planting the ancient grain varietals. He started with Sossaman and two other farmers planting three varieties of wheat. He now has six farmers planting 14 types.

Zimmerman hopes the organic and heritage flour market can grow like the organic and heritage vegetable market. He is telling bakers they should buy their own mills, even though it would cut into his business, since he believes it will raise interest in the locally sourced wheat.

“A rising tide lifts all boats,” Zimmerman said. “We are close to leading the country with our grain movement.”

by Richard Ruelas, The Republic | azcentral.com 9:44 p.m. MST October 17, 2014

Albion flour mill silos demolished

October 8, 2014

 – Brisbane Times and Sun-Herald journalist

“For years they towered over Brisbane’s inner-north. But on Wednesday, with no fanfare, they were consigned to history. The Albion flour mill’s silos, which stood tall even after an arson attack destroyed the mill itself last year, were demolished on Wednesday to make way for new unit blocks.”

The former Defiance flour mill at Albion

The former Defiance flour mill at Albion

The Albion flour mill has been demolished to make way for new unit blocks. Photo: Glenn Hunt

 

Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/albion-flour-mill-silos-demolished-20141008-1139cl.html#ixzz3FdaNrjo4

Kansas State University’s IGP Institute announces on-site and distance course offerings for professionals in the grain, flour and feed industries.

MANHATTAN, Kan. – “The challenge to feed a growing global population cannot be achieved without a steady and sustainable grain pipeline from the United States to the rest of the world,” says Dirk Maier, IGP Institute director. With that situation in mind, the IGP Institute team members have been busy making plans for 2015 and are excited to announce their new initiatives for the year ahead.

One of the new opportunities on the horizon is the expanded partnership between the IGP Institute and GEAPS (Grain Elevator Processing Society).

“In addition to coordinating distance trainings in grain handling, starting in January, we will also partner with GEAPS to offer online courses and a credential in grain-processing management,” says Mark Fowler, IGP Institute associate director. Expanding these courses to include processing trainings allows the two organizations to leverage the resources and networks for both organizations.

Along with that, in 2015, the IGP Institute is incorporating more blended-learning opportunities for its participants. Blended learning involves participants completing online training prior to coming to the IGP Institute for the hands-on education.
“By delivering the foundational knowledge through distance courses that allows us to spend the majority of the on-site time applying and demonstrating principles in the mill and labs,” Fowler says. He also says there is increased knowledge retention when material is shared with participants over a longer period of time.

“Distance courses allow students to get a theory and feel online. On-site courses are redeveloped to focus on the hands-on applications,” says Mark Fowler, IGP associate director. “We are changing; we are moving forward.”
One of the ways the organization is changing is to restructure some of its trainings for on-site courses. Two of the June courses have been renamed and refocused. The basic milling course is renamed to IGP-KSU Managing Mill Balance and Control. The advanced milling course is renamed to IGP-KSU Milling Practices to Improve Flour Quality.

“Our courses are three and a half days with the majority of the time applying the material hands-on,” Fowler says.

Another new growth opportunity is coming with an expanded offering in the feed manufacturing and grain management trainings. Plans are being made for more feed safety and feed management courses as well as activities related to grain quality management.

Finally, the IGP Institute continues to maintain its high quality grain marketing and risk management offerings. In addition, plans are underway for partnership trainings with the Northern Crops Institute both domestically and abroad.

To view the full schedules for on-site trainings and distance offerings, see below. For more information or to register for either platform, visit IGP online at www.grains.k-state.edu/IGP. For on-site training questions, contact the IGP program coordinator at telephone: +1 785-532-4070. For distance learning offering questions, contact the distance education coordinator at telephone: +1 785-532-4053.
For More Information Contact: Lisa Moser
IGP Marketing and Communications Coordinator
telephone: +1 785-477-4837; lmoser@ksu.edu.

_ _ _ _ _
2015 IGP Institute On-site Courses
January
IGP–KSU Grain Elevator Managers – Jan. 5–9
IGP–KSU Introduction to Flour Milling – Jan. 12–16
February
AFIA–KSU Advanced Pelleting
March
Buhler–KSU Expert Milling (English) – March 16–20
Buhler–KSU Expert Milling (Spanish) – March 23–27
IGP–NCI Singapore
April
IGP–KSU Grain Purchasing
NGFA–AFIA–KSU Establishing a HACCP for the Feed Industry
May
IGP–KSU Grain Elevators Managers – May 4–8
June
Buhler–KSU Executive Milling (English) – June 1–5
IGP–KSU Managing Mill Balance & Control – June 2–5
IGP–KSU Milling Practices to Improve Flour Quality – June 9–12
CANIMOLT – June 15–19
USW Nigerian Flour Milling – June 16–25
August
IGP–KSU Extrusion Processing: Technology and Commercialization – Aug. 10–14
Buhler–KSU Executive Milling (Spanish) – Aug. 10–14
IGP–KSU Risk Management
RAPCO Poultry
AFIA–KSU Advanced Feed Manufacturing on Maintenance
Buhler–KSU Flowsheet Technology (English) – Aug. 17–21
September
Buhler–KSU Flowsheet Technology (Spanish) – Sept. 14–18
IGP–KSU Feed Manufacturing
October
NGFA–AFIA–KSU Establishing a HACCP for the Feed Industry
IGP–KSU Bulk Solids Handling and Flow
AIBI–KSU Grain Milling and HACCP Workshop
November
RAPCO Feed
Buhler–KSU Executive Milling (English) – Nov. 9–13
IGP–KSU Pet Food 101
December
2015 KSU-GEAPS Distance Courses
Jan. 5–Feb. 6
Registration opens Nov. 17, closes Dec. 16
GEAPS 520 – Quality Grain Management (English and Spanish)
GEAPS 522 – FGIS Grain Inspection Orientation
GEAPS 554 – Equipment Maintenance I
GEAPS 550 – Materials Handling I
Feb. 9–March 13
Registration opens Jan. 5, closes Feb. 3
GEAPS 521 – Aeration System Design
GEAPS 530 – Quality Management Systems
GEAPS 542 – Electrical Safety
GEAPS 544 – Preventing Grain Dust Explosions
GEAPS 600 – Overview of Milling Principles (Processing)
March 16–April 17
Registration opens Feb. 2, closes March 10
GEAPS 500 – Intro to Grain Operations (English and Spanish)
GEAPS 555 – Advanced Equipment Maintenance
GEAPS 540 – Entry Level Safety – new
GEAPS 620 – Grain Receiving, Cleaning & Conditioning (Processing)
April 20–May 22
Registration opens March 16, closes April 14
GEAPS 525 – Management of Insect Pests
GEAPS 545 – Grain Entrapment
GEAPS 510 – Facilities Planning & Design I
May 25–June 26
Registration opens April 27, closes May 19
GEAPS 511 – Facilities Planning & Design II – new
GEAPS 541 – Developing an Effective Safety Culture
GEAPS 551 – Materials Handling II
Sept. 14–Oct. 16
Registration opens July 13, closes Sept. 1
GEAPS 524 – Grain Drying
GEAPS 540 – Entry Level Safety (English and Spanish)
Nov. 2–Dec. 4
Registration opens Sept. 14, closes Oct. 27
GEAPS 552 – Materials Handling III
GEAPS 501 – Management Basics
GEAPS 630 – Quality Control/Quality Assurance Practices in Flour Milling (Processing)
GEAPS XXX – The Grain Industry in Canada: Climate, Crops and People – new

2012 to 2014…VIV China 2014 set for success

The International Milling Directory, as part of Perendale Publishers, proud to be an official media partner of VIV China 2014.

VIV China: from Feed to Meat
In its role as the nation’s platform on animal production and meat processing, VIV China showcases the industry’s developments by the Feed to Meat concept. Feed to meat brings together supply and demand within the complete animal protein chain. The driver behind the chain concept is that animal feed and animal health are vital for meat quality and safety. VIV China will represent every step in the meat production process. Related topics will be featured in the VIV China Conference.

In 2012, the last time VIV China was held, the organising team led by Ruwan Berculo, made plans for this year’s events. They have come around to be right on plan and built on the solid foundations of 2012. Milling for animal feed is a large part of the event and the Chinese market has grown since 2012. Let’s take a look back to the report from 2012:–

VIV China has once again profiled itself as an international platform for products, knowledge and technology for the Chinese animal protein production industry. Following many positive reactions to the event, project manager Ruwan Berculo concludes that the new concept is a success and can act as a blueprint for the next exhibition. The next VIV China is planned for 2014, from 23-25 September. “A compact, high-quality exhibition with a high visitor level, many international delegations, people from emerging economies and a Chinese business audience specifically attracted by innovations,” Berculo summarises afterwards. “You could feel the amazing energy in the air. The enthusiasm and the interest have reinforced our idea that this is what the animal protein industry in China needs. With very well-attended congresses, seminars and receptions parallel to the exhibition, we created a network meeting that counts. Moreover, the atmosphere was great. The top and sub top of the industry have attended; so 13,874 visitors is a high score.”

VIV China received delegations from the Middle East, Russia and South East Asia, among others. The exhibitors were full of praise about the new approach. According to Ruwan Berculo, for Chinese exhibitors, the exhibition was the perfect method to present themselves to the world. The Dutch delegation was also prominent, also due to the co-operating businesses in the poultry sector, the Dutch Poultry Centre. In the words of president Jos Ramekers it was a very successful exhibition, judging by the many contacts established with Chinese interested parties. On behalf of the Product Board Animal Feed, Tjeerd den Hollander said: “The VIV-summit was a very successful exposure for our project for comparing the feed import legislation of China and the EU. As a result of the summit we received lots of positive comments and reflection on our project, which gave us useful information for the finalisation of the project.”

More positive reactions about the International China Summit followed, including from Jeroen Leffelaar, Global Head Animal Protein at Rabobank: “The strong attendance at the International China Summit proved once again that Chinese professionals in animal protein production are very committed to being updated on trends and developments in their industry. In co-operation with VIV, we created an excellent opportunity to share our visions with these valuable relations.” Marleen Boerjan of Pas Reform also speaks highly of the result of the seminars: “During the seminar we provided the most up-to-date information on modular single stage incubation. We are very grateful to VIV for their support and hospitality in hosting this event and to the hatchery professionals who attended. All their questions and involvement made it such an interesting and successful occasion. We look forward to the next seminar”. The first edition of the International China Summit, on Saturday preceding the exhibition, was attended by 266 delegates. The parallel seminars on this day as well as the Closing Plenary Conference were also extremely popular and attracted large audiences.

In addition to the International China Summit, the Food Safety Poultry Forum on Friday September 21 was also well-attended. Poultry International China Edition and WATT also attracted over 100 interested visitors with a series of leading speakers. Greg Watt, President/CEO at WATT, immediately stated his wish to repeat this valuable meeting prior to VIV China 2014. The last congress was organised by the Chinese Association of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine (CAAV) on the second exhibition day in the NCIEC. The Beijing International Breeding Pig Industry Development Symposium attracted 300 Chinese and international delegates. Initiator Mr Machuang, Director International Affairs at CAAV, looks back on this success with great pleasure.

 

Many print copies of the International Milling Directory will be on display at Perendale’s stand W1.G078 so do make sure you can visit the stand!

New AACCI approved RVA Method for Determining the Gelatinization Temperature for Milled Rice Flour

International Milling Directory member, Perten Instruments has just gained an approval for their new flour analysis method called the RVA (Rapid Visco Analyser)

The RVA (Rapid Visco Analyser) Method for Determining the Gelatinization Temperature for Milled Rice Flour has been approved by AACCI (American Association of Cereal Chemists) as Method number 61-04.01.

Gelatinization temperature (GT) is commonly measured to assess rice cooking and processing potential. A faster method using a small quantity of sample has been desired for some time as traditional methods of estimating rice GT using the amylograph and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are time-consuming and, in the case of the amylograph, require large quantities of samples – not well suited to rice breeding requirements. The Rapid Visco Analyser (RVA) is a cooking, stirring viscometer with ramped temperature and variable shear capability. It is commonly used in laboratories to measure the pasting properties of rice and provides the advantages of speed, ease of use, and small sample size requirements. In parallel testing with the traditional methods, the new RVA method also provided more precise results.

Further reading:
Read more about the  New RVA Method in the Perten Science World issue No 9.
General information about The Rapid Visco Analyser (RVA) can be found here.

 

For more information please contact:

Perten Instruments Stockholm:
Mark Bason
Business Development Manager Rheology.
Phone: +46 8 505 80 900
E-mail: mbason@perten.com

Introducing: CropMech Ltd

CropMechLtd

CropMech Ltd

The International Milling Directory today welcomed a new member, CropMech Ltd.

As their synopsis on their company page says:-

Cropmech Ltd have successfully installed the first DV hydraulic grain sampling spear in the UK, using the double suction Stork 440 Compact sampler at their grain storage site situated at Risdon Mill, near Okehampton, Devon. The sampler allows safety & ease of testing all cereals, flours, rice, seeds & straights with extreme rapidity without altering the quality of the product during sampling.
With an option of two different probes, double suction & spiral, you can install the type of sampler suitable for your business needs.

 

Register your company at www.internationalmilling.com today – from free – and join our 23rd year’s edition.

‘It’s about meeting the growing demand for better food’

VIV Europe 2014 has a strong feed flavour

Feed forms a focal point of VIV Europe 2014. Global developments in the composition and manufacturing of feeds will feature strongly at this international trade show. “We always cover the agribusiness spectrum from feed to meat in every VIV event. But Utrecht in May will underline the feed aspect in several ways,” confirms exhibition manager Ruwan Berculo. “For example, when our visitors arrive at the show they will find that a hall near to the main entrance contains displays by all the leading suppliers of feed manufacturing technology as well as for companies marketing ingredients and additives. A second hall only about a minute away on foot will have more nutritional products on show.”

GITP20100421VIV1070

Extend automation further into the process

Preliminary calculations tell us that there will be more than 40 exhibitors with machinery or equipment for feed mills. In addition about 15 companies supplying feed manufacturing systems will be represented on the stands forming a special pavilion. In addition global suppliers will shine their light on the profitability and competitiveness of feed manufacturing, by offering a view of how automation can be extended further into the processes of the mill. Ruwan continues: “Everyone in the feed business can gain from the knowledge shared during the various sessions as well as from seeing the innovations at display.“

It is something that has been emphasised repeatedly in the series of VIV Europe Roadshows which travelled around the world to promote the main event this spring. The directors and managers of feed manufacturing companies that attended these Roadshows have already made plans to attend the show in May, because of its strong feed flavour.

Intensification has to be sustainable

“We primarily aim to be a platform for all of the leading technology and know-how in the field of animal protein production in growth countries that currently have the greatest need for this. In addition, we of course also focus our range of solutions on major European countries and the United States in order to achieve even more innovative and higher quality livestock, meat and egg production systems in those countries – all of course with clear preconditions for sustainability because the world has now discovered that intensification has to be sustainable. This is something we are already seeing in the far afield countries, where there is more interest in animal welfare and food safety than you may imagine. Meeting the growing need for animal protein products is not just simply a case of even bigger and more intensive.GITP20100421VIV0515

With the theme of ‘sustainability’ Berculo is alluding to the misconception that this only relates to organic production. “It’s about answering the question about how we can meet the growing demand for better food and how we can develop that in a sustainable manner, throughout the world. What is required for that and meets the latest requirements will be here at the show. We have what has never been on show before, like we’ve promised.”

Attending VIV Europe is free upon registration. Please click here for your free ticket.

VIV Europe 2014

VIV Europe 2014

 

Inspire Forum

The International Milling Directory is pleased to announce a great update from an event chaired by one of its member companies. AB Vista‘s Research Director Mike Bedford provided a great platform for the industry of feed nutrition to expose some great research for knowledge and understanding. A report direct from the forum is below in this post.

 

INSPIRE FORUM HIGHLIGHTS COMPLEX NATURE OF PLANT NSPs AND THE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THEIR NUTRITIONAL IMPACT

The inaugural Inspire: Non-starch Polysaccharide (NSP) Forum got underway yesterday with 80 delegates from 23 countries hearing presentations aimed at generating a deeper understanding of the complex structures of plant NSPs and the factors that influence their nutritional impact. It was the first of three sessions across the three days of the Forum looking, respectively at aspects of the NSP substrate, the impact of fibre on animal nutrition and feed enzyme solutions to improve efficacy and sustainability.

Chairing this first session, AB Vista Research Director Mike Bedford highlighted the importance of understanding how NSPs were synthesised and structured when the target was to achieve effective and targeted breakdown using exogenous enzymes.

The process by which cellulose is synthesised was outlined by Dr Staffan Persson of the Max Planck Institute. This was followed by a review of the arabinoxylan structure of cereal grains using a fluorescently-labelled inactivated xylanase by Joran Verspeet of KU Leuven, a technique which also highlighted clear evidence of specificity between different xylanases and different arabionoxylan structures.

Stan Cauvain of Baketran then discussed the experience of the breadmaking industry in using xylanases to overcome the water retaining ability of grain NSPs to maintain bread quality. It was problem that had grown considerably as demand for high fibre wholemeal bread increased during the past 30 years.

Mr Cauvain stated: “The problem is that we have very little idea of why xylanase works in breadmaking. We know how to control the results, but we don’t know exactly what is happening in terms of the interaction between the enzyme and grain quality.”

Mr Cauvain also highlighted the enormous challenge faced by his industry due to the variability in fibre content between flour batches, between flour types and between growing seasons. The inability to reliably predict response to xylanase addition – or the effect of the xylanase inhibitors known to be present in some grains – meant a heavy reliance on extensive and regular trial and error screening, a situation with considerable parallels in the feed industry.

The session closed with a presentation by Dr Per Aman of the Swedish University of Agricultural Science, who discussed the challenges faced when trying to analyse plant fibre.

“None of the methodologies currently used produce exactly the same substrate conditions as found in the animal gut,” he stated. “In terms of the characteristics important to animal nutrition, the molecular structure of the fibre component can be hugely important, as can agronomic conditions.

“For example, the branching on the xylose backbone of arabinoxylan molecules dictates the extent of viscosity effects, as well as how and where xylanases can act to break down those long-chain molecules. Differences between growing sites can also exceed varietal differences, and a detailed knowledge of these factors is essential when looking to understand xylanase activity.”

Those interested in receiving the latest information before and during the forum can follow @inspireforum or the #nspforum hashtag on Twitter. A full list of speakers can be found at inspireforum.com.