The Alltech Poultry Seminar

With high feed costs, increased government regulations and consumer demands intensifying, the future of the poultry industry is difficult to predict. This was the focus of Alltech’s 10th Poultry Solutions Seminar, held in Hannover, Germany on the 12th of November, where a number of distinguished poultry industry experts gave presentations on their cutting edge research and on the issues that they believe will be of most importance.

Antibiotic resistance is getting more and more publicity and governments are starting  to take notice. Dr. Marcel Boereboom, of the Royal Dutch Society for Veterinary Medicine, discussed the impact this is having on the Dutch industry, following a study by the Dutch Health Council. He described how the government of the Netherlands have, to date, banned certain antibiotics and implemented a targeted reduction of 50% (of 2009 levels) of the total amount of antibiotics used in food producing animals by 2013. This has had a huge impact on how poultry is produced.

Focussing on how to deal with this issue was Professor Stephen Collett from the University of Georgia. He recommended a shift in emphasis in gut health management, from working against pathogens, to working with the intestinal microbial community. This involves improving performance by accelerating the evolution and maintaining the stability of favourable intestinal microbiota. The three most important areas of an effective intestinal health management programme include: “seeding” the gut with favourable organisms, “feeding” the favourable organisms and “weeding” out the unfavourable organisms.

Professor Roselina Angel, of the University of Maryland, described to attendees at the Poultry Solutions Seminar research on how neonatal conditioning, resulting in epigenetic changes shows great promise in terms of improving phosphorus (P) utilisation. “By applying a moderate P deficiency in young chicks, the bird is conditioned to utilise P more efficiently throughout its life. The timing of the conditioning is critical and requires a clear understanding of skeletal growth, the main driver of calcium (Ca) and P requirements,” she explained.

Controlling campylobacter, a bacteria that poses no danger to poultry, but is the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, was the topic of Professor Frank Pasmans’ presentation, researched at Ghent University. When a single bird is infected, the infection spreads quickly through the flock, resulting in the majority of birds being colonised within only a few days after Campylobacter entry. He explained how, overall, the outlook is bleak if the flock has been infected but results of recent studies, using oral administration of bovine or chicken immunoglobulins of hyper-immunised animals and the use of bacteriocins to limit caecal colonisation, look promising. “We are still quite a way from commercialised products but the future does seem to be positive,” he explained.

To deal with unpredictable feed costs and an inconsistent supply, Professor David Roland of Auburn University,  recommends his “econometric approach to the feeding of layers. “Feeding correctly is challenging because nutrient requirements and dietary levels needed for optimal returns are continually changing” said Prof. Roland as he opened his talk.

He presented his calculation tool called Econometrics to attendees, demonstrating how optimal econometric feeding can improve performance, returns and help regulate feed and egg prices at the same time.

For a more detailed account of the talks at the Solutions Seminars visit www.alltech.com/blog

No Limitations for New Romer Labs Product

Leading global food-safety diagnostic experts Romer Labs have announced the launch of a new product for an effective clean-up prior to multi-mycotoxin analysis. The MycoSpinTM 400 Multitoxin column enhances the performance of LC-MS/MS methods and promises straightforward sample preparation with no limitations by molecular mass of the analyte
The machines cleanup columns, in conjunction with BiopureTM 13C labeled internal standards, achieve new performance levels in LC-MS/MS analysis and furthermore, BiopureTM 13C isotope-labeled internal standards overcome the ionization effect by stabilizing the system to the effects of signal suppression and signal enhancement.
Thanks to 30years of experience, Romer Labs has developed a series of method applications using this new approach of a MycoSpinTM cleanup with BiopureTM internal standards. These methods are validated for the simultaneous detection of multiple mycotoxins in cereal grains, mixed feeds, and corn, including corn by-products.
Romer Labs is the leading company in LC-MS/MS applications for multi-mycotoxin analysis. Its broad range of innovative products include the largest portfolio of reference materials worldwide, as well as a series of cleanup-columns for extract purification ranging from the well-known MycoSep® columns to specific antibody-based immunoaffinity StarLineTM columns.

Romer Labs, founded in Washington, in 1982 is a leading developing manufacturer of test kits for food allergens, food pathogens, mycotoxins, veterinary drug residues and other food contaminants. The company also operates four accredited, full-service laboratories on three continents. Romer Labs has facilities in Austria, Brazil, China, Malaysia, Singapore, UK and the USA. For more than 30 years, Romer Labs has been a trusted partner for the food and feed industry worldwide.

www.romerlabs.com

Small Gains Earn Top Award

The winner of the 2012 Nabim/HGCA Milling Wheat Challenge has been announced reports Farmers Guardian. Bedfordshire farm manager Andrew Robinson has taken this year’s award with his 2,232acre plot which has been growing for over thirty-years.

Despite small marginal gains the Farms manager at Heathcote Farms, near Toddington, was praised by judges for his engagement with the milling trade, his solid business foundations and his ability to aggregate them for a positive net business benefit.

There were two other finalists, Andrew Martin of Broadstream Farming, Kent and Mark Boyd of John Boyd Farms, also from Kent.

The duty of judging this year’s winner fell to Martin Savage of NABIM, Pat Thornton of HGCA and Lincolnshire farmer Mark Ireland. They said that each finalist demonstrated attention to detail and a strong commitment to the milling trade’s needs and processes.

Mr Thornton said, “Andrew’s methodical approach shows a deep understanding of good agronomy, and demonstrates an excellent understanding of what his market wants from him.”

All three finalists demonstrated they were forward-thinking and could consistently grow quality crops of bread-making wheats – even in a year as challenging as 2012,” he added.

“All three finalists were on top of their disease control and when we made the farm assessments in June, all crops were full of potential. Unfortunately, the first 14 days of grain fill, which are so important, were blighted by bad weather . The result is that milling wheat supply is more than one million tonnes down on the national forecast,” said Mr Thornton.

http://www.farmersguardian.com/home/

http://www.nabim.org.uk/

http://www.hgca.com/

Milling executives attend hands-on course at the International Grains Program.

One of IMD‘s biggest companies Buhler have hosted a hands on grains program. Mill owners, directors and managers from around the world traveled to the Inter- national Grains Program Nov. 5-9, 2012 for the Buhler-KSU Executive Milling short course. The course was held at Kansas State University’s International Grains Program and the Hal Ross Flour Mill where 15 participants experienced a hands-on learning opportunity.

The course was led by Tobias Naenny from the Buhler Training Center in Uzwil, Switzerland. Assisting him were two Department of Grain Science and Industry faculty members John Steinfort, Buhler adjunct instructor, and Shawn Thiele, milling operations manager.

In describing the course, Steinfort says, “The course is designed to educate milling executives and non-operation managers on all aspects of the milling process, which will help them to make better business and managerial decisions on a daily basis.”

One participant eager to learn was Luis Villaverde, director of Guatemala operations with Molinos Modernos. Villaverde was grateful for the experts who shared their expertise and the background of milling. He found the information useful as his company begins to expand their wheat mill.
“I was interested in the knowledge and being able to take advantage of the expertise from the people in the business. This course allowed me to better understand the business as a whole,” Villaverde says.

Luis Villaverde Mayo, Molinos Modernso, S.A., Guatemala; Jose Puig, Galletas Puig, Venezuela; and Carlos Puig, Galletas Puig, Venezuela, look at the equipment in the Hal Ross Flour Mill.

Throughout the week participants were in the classroom learning the basics of flour milling and then headed to the mill to apply those principals. From the Hal Ross Flour Mill to the Shellenberger Hall milling laboratory, they had the opportunity to put their skills to the test. These trainings allowed participants to learn about purifiers, milling machinery, proper cleaning procedures and the milling process.

“Going to the mill for workshops was very rich,” Villaverde says. “I have learned about the properties of the grain and the milling process from breaks all the way to getting the flour.”
Not only did the experts teach the participants, but the participants were able to network and learn from each other. Villaverde says he enjoyed exchanging ideas with other participants and seeing how their companies handled situations.

This is just one example of the many partnership trainings offered through IGP. In addition to flour milling and grain processing, IGP offers trainings in the areas of feed manufacturing and grain management, and grain marketing and risk management. For more information about training opportunities at IGP visit the IGP website.

Grinding for Feed

Check out this video on the grinding process in the poultry feed production by M. Baumann of Buhler.
By: Marco Baumann

Grinding process in the poultry feed production. M. Baumann (Buhler)

Courtesy of www.engormix.com.

IPPE News

Back by popular demand, the Poultry Market Intelligence Forum is returning to the 2013 International Production & Processing Expo. Sponsored by U.S. Poultry & Egg Association (USPOULTRY) and the National Poultry & Food Distributors Association (NFPDA), the program will identify the challenges facing the industry and provide insight into how domestic and international poultry industries are positioned to move forward in 2013. The Poultry Market Intelligence Forum is free to all Expo and NPFDA meeting attendees.

USPOULTRY president John Starkey said, “The Poultry Market Intelligence Forum has been one of the most popular programs on the Expo schedule since its inception, and we are pleased to add it back for 2013.” He added, “Feed costs, global competition, and consumer demand present constant challenges for the poultry and egg industry, so it is important to stay informed about current conditions and projections for the future. This program helps keep industry leaders current on the various factors that could impact their financial performance.”

The program will feature two noted industry economists and a major food service provider. Mike Donohue, Agri Stats, will review Performance Trends for the Poultry and Egg Industry. Dr. Paul Aho, Poultry Perspective, will discuss Domestic and Global Drivers for 2013. Barry Barnett, Vice President of Global Supply and Purchasing for Church’s Chicken, will provide insight into The Customer’s View of the Poultry and Egg Industry.

The 2013 IPPE, one of the world’s largest poultry, feed, and meat industry events, will be held from January 29-31, 2013, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA. The Poultry Market Intelligence Forum is scheduled from 9 – 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, January 30.

Visit www.ipe13.org for more information.

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Swedish Firm Celebrate 50years with 3rd Generation Analysis System

Perten have announced the release of the DA 7250, a new NIR instrument designed for superior analysis accuracy of many product types in all types of environments. The Swedish firm have said that the DA 7250 removes and reduces many sources of error common to other NIR instruments.

The design incorporates non-moving optical components, internal temperature stabilization, a static hard drive encased in an IP65 rated (dust proof/water resistant) housing. It employs a large spot-size, even larger analysis area, averages many sub-samples, and uses high energy throughput diode array optics to ensure accurate and representative analysis of heterogeneous samples.

The DA 7250

Perten have recommended also that many sample types are analyzed using non-contact sampling – requiring little or no sample prep and little or no cleaning – removing cross-contamination and sample cell errors. The instrument workflow is uncomplicated encouraging correct and frequent analysis by operators interested in monitoring and controlling plant processes.

This release marks a substantial development in enhancing accuracy in analyzing with large, transferable calibrations and databases covering many products and parameters enabling rapid implementation. Existing applications include dairy, grain processing, feed, flour, oilseeds, meat, snackfood, petfood, starch, and ethanol production.

Thanks to new and updated software The DA 7250 can also be networked and administered remotely.

Speaking about the product Product Manager Stefan Tordernmalm said, “The DA 7250 provides the accuracy required to improve quality and control processes, the versatility to analyze nearly any product, the robustness to be placed nearly anywhere, the speed to measure anytime, and the advanced features required by researchers while maintaining simplicity of routine operation.”

Perten are currently listed in the IMD while you can also visit their website for more information at www.perten.com.