The Grain Chain

The International Milling Directory is glad to promote a video from The Grain Chain. The Grain Chain programme is a collaboration of the HGCA, Federation of Bakers (FoB) and Flour Advisory Bureau (FAB). It is the successor to the Flour and Grain Education Programme which was launched in 2002. The International Milling Directory always supports training and wishes to promote this further in any small way at all.

Logo GrainChain - Natural resource for teachers

The Grain Chain

 

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wyhzKX97Vk]


The transformation of wheat seeds into flour. See the grain during different stages of the milling process and the machines that crush, grind, sift and separate the grain to give us flour, bran and wheat feed.”

Grainchain.com is a curriculum linked education resource for teachers and parents to inform school-aged children about the story of grain-based food – from the farm to mill to plate. Find tailored teaching materials, worksheets, videos, quizzes, recipes and activities about farming, milling and baking.

 

HGCA and nabim: 2014 Milling Wheat Challenge annouced!

nabim

nabim

The International Milling Directory’s sister magazine, Grain & Feed Milling Technology, covered the Milling Wheat Challenge last year. There is excitement in the announcement of this year’s competition. Launched by nabim and HGCA in the United Kingdom once again, we hope many users of the International Milling Directory appreciate this news and content; a blog from the HGCA below:–

nabim, supported by HGCA, has launched the fifth Milling Wheat Challenge competition to find the UK’s outstanding grower of quality milling wheat.

HGCA

HGCA

Martin Savage, nabim‘s Trade Policy Manager said “The competition has gone from strength to strength. In the past four years, it has discovered an amazing group of finalists who are at the forefront of UK wheat production. The winners have each shown that they are progressive in their business as well as their crop husbandry and that they can consistently grow quality crops of bread-making wheats.”

The competition has become established as a way for Britain’s flour millers to formally recognise the value of the country’s best growers to the processing trade.

We are committed to working with UK wheat growers and we are looking for farmers who combine attention to detail with end-customer awareness and business acumen to create a win: win for the whole wheat chain” Martin said.

“Growing quality wheat consistently is a difficult task which requires best practice in growing, storage and delivery to meet the exacting standards of the milling trade.”

HGCA is pleased to be supporting the competition as a way of promoting best practice in both the growing and the marketing of milling wheat. Richard Laverick from HGCA said: “Our aim is to find growers who have a good understanding of their end market, their business costs and an ability to reflect both in their marketing of milling wheat.”

Entry forms are available via the nabim and HGCA websites. The closing date for entries will be Friday, 2 May 2014 and the three finalists will be announced at the Cereals Event on 11 June. On-farm judging of the finalists will take place in late June. The competition judges are Martin Savage from nabim, Richard Laverick from HGCA and Mark Ireland, a Lincolnshire Farmer and former “Farmers Weekly Arable Farmer of the Year”.

The three finalists in the 2013 Milling Wheat Challenge were Stephen Craggs, East Close Farm, Sedgefield, Stockton-on-Tees, James Loder-Symonds, Denne Hill Farm, Womenswold, Canterbury, Kent and Nick & David Philip, Church Farm, Waltham St Lawrence, Reading, Berkshire. The overall winner was Stephen Craggs.

Mark Ireland said that “All three finalists were very good producers of quality wheat” and he added that what set Stephen Craggs apart was his total commitment to detail. “Despite faming with a challenging climate he has developed a simple yet robust system to produce consistent quality. On top of a very strong business, his technical insight and attention to detail gave him the edge. He also has a very rational approach to risk management as well as a proactive approach to going beyond the basics of what a miller wants from a grower.”

Martin Savage urged growers to enter the competition, explaining: “The Challenge is a great way for growers to engage with the supply chain. UK flour millers remain committed to our farmers.”

The finalists, their partners and an additional guest, together with leaders from the UK wheat supply chain, will be invited to a celebration dinner hosted by nabim in October at the Ritz Hotel in London where the overall winner will be announced.

Small Gains Earn Top Award

The winner of the 2012 Nabim/HGCA Milling Wheat Challenge has been announced reports Farmers Guardian. Bedfordshire farm manager Andrew Robinson has taken this year’s award with his 2,232acre plot which has been growing for over thirty-years.

Despite small marginal gains the Farms manager at Heathcote Farms, near Toddington, was praised by judges for his engagement with the milling trade, his solid business foundations and his ability to aggregate them for a positive net business benefit.

There were two other finalists, Andrew Martin of Broadstream Farming, Kent and Mark Boyd of John Boyd Farms, also from Kent.

The duty of judging this year’s winner fell to Martin Savage of NABIM, Pat Thornton of HGCA and Lincolnshire farmer Mark Ireland. They said that each finalist demonstrated attention to detail and a strong commitment to the milling trade’s needs and processes.

Mr Thornton said, “Andrew’s methodical approach shows a deep understanding of good agronomy, and demonstrates an excellent understanding of what his market wants from him.”

All three finalists demonstrated they were forward-thinking and could consistently grow quality crops of bread-making wheats – even in a year as challenging as 2012,” he added.

“All three finalists were on top of their disease control and when we made the farm assessments in June, all crops were full of potential. Unfortunately, the first 14 days of grain fill, which are so important, were blighted by bad weather . The result is that milling wheat supply is more than one million tonnes down on the national forecast,” said Mr Thornton.

http://www.farmersguardian.com/home/

http://www.nabim.org.uk/

http://www.hgca.com/

Late Harvest Not Worth the Weight?

POOR specific weights stand out in provisional results from the HGCA Cereal Quality Survey for 2012 reports Farmers Guardian (FG). Wheat average specific weight figures are down considerably on those seen in recent seasons.

According to the report the average specific weight for harvest to date is considerably lower than in recent seasons, at 71.9kg/hl against 78.7kg/hl in 2011 and a three-year average of 77.5kg/hl.

Average specific weights in the South East are 72.1kg/hl, were down 6.8 per cent on the three-year average and in the East 72.2kg/hl, that deficit is 7.4 per cent – some of the lowest on record since 1977.

The average Hagberg Falling Number (HFN) for harvest to date is 267 seconds, compared with 269 in 2011, which has been lower than average so far. But,”has been within acceptable levels” according to HGCA market specialist Charlotte Garbutt.

However FG has suggested that early results show protein levels are slightly higher, although there is a bias towards quality wheats (59 per cent of the wheat samples included in the provisional results came from NABIM groups 1 and 2).

Average protein content for harvest to date is 12.7 per cent, compared with 12 per cent for final 2011 results and the three- year average of 11.8 per cent.

The results indicate that 26 per cent of the 4,032 NABIM group 1 and 2 samples received met a medium quality bread wheat specification (74kg/hl specific weight, 180 HFN, 12.5 per cent protein) but only 4 per cent of group 1 samples met full bread milling specifications.

Mrs Garbutt said, “The overriding reason for such a low achievement of full specification is the specific weight quality criteria.

“Only 17 per cent of all NABIM group 1 samples collected for 2012 to date have achieved 76kg/hl, compared to 92 per cent last year.”

According to FG the provisional 2012 estimates for barley show a lower specific weight and poorer screenings compared to a year ago but nitrogen content levels are better.

www.farmersguardian.com

www.hgca.com

European Harvest: August 3rd, 2012.

FarmingUK reports that EU grains finished mixed with Nov 12 London wheat down £0.50/tonne to £188.50/tonne and Nov 12 Paris wheat up €0.75/tonne to €256.00/tonne.
InterFax have also said that Russia’s total 2012/13 grain exports are now estimated at 12 MMT versus the previous estimate of 16 MMT.
The USDA attaché in Russia estimates Russia’s 2012 grain crop significantly higher at 81.0 MMT, including 47 MMT of wheat, 15 MMT of barley and 7.5 MMT of corn. Grain exports are pegged at 15.0 MMT, including 11 MMT of wheat, 2 MMT of barley, and 1.5 MMT of corn.
UK harvesting of winter barley and oilseed rape started about 7-10 days later than normally expected with about 40% of the winter barley and almost 20% of the winter oilseed rape area harvested by 31 July, mostly in the south according to the HGCA with wheat harvesting expected to commence in just over a week.

They said, “Early indications are that UK winter barley yields are close to average at around 6.3 MT/ha with improved yields from normal on light land. Quality is variable,”

“Early indications are that UK rapeseed yields are close to the five year average at around 3.5 MT/ha, lower than the record yield of 3.9 MT/ha in 2011,” they conclude.

Meanwhile the German Farmers Union (DBV) say that the winter barley harvest there is nearly complete, with yields averaging 6.3 MT/ha. The rapeseed harvest is around 70% done with yields averaging 3.3 MT.ha, they add.

Mycotoxin Risk High in Cereal Supply

High humidity and wet weather in the UK could set a high risk of mycotoxins in cereals this year according to a warning from HGCA reports NFU.

Weather conditions for many regions last season were relatively dry and, in general, mycotoxin levels remained below the legal limits. However, farmers and producers are being encouraged to air on the side of caution of the European legislative limits for the most common mycotoxins in grain intended for human consumption and also for feed.

Extra vigilance will be required by everyone in the grain supply chain according to Senior Research Manager  Dr Simon Oxley. He said. “Record-breaking wet conditions during flowering could mean that the risk of mycotoxins is much higher than the past two years.”

He added, “Although using the risk assessment can help growers manage mycotoxin risk, significant risk factors, such as rainfall, cannot be controlled. This season, as mycotoxin risk is potentially high, it is particularly important for growers to ask what their end market requires.”

The total UK rainfall was 145.3mm – twice the average amount and the wettest since records began in 1910, and its sheer volume has been a concern. Talking about its effect Professor Simon Edwards of Harper Adams University College said, “This led to a ‘double whammy’ in terms of potential mycotoxin risk: the rain caused difficulty for some when applying T3 protectant ear sprays and wet humid conditions over the critical flowering period proved ideal for fusarium infection.”

Unfortunately July has also been wet but this recent spell of heat has provided some small hope for farmers across the country. However August is going to be as equally unpredictable according to the Met office with the south likely to see the most of whatever dry and bright weather there is.

www.global-milling.com

www.nfuonlie.com

www.hgca.com

www.metoffice.gov.uk