Mathews Company Launches OnDemand Video Tutorials

Crystal Lake, IL – Mathews Company (M-C), a global manufacturer of grain dryers, is launching a series of video tutorials on its website and YouTube® channel as an extension of its M-C University Technical Training program. The purpose of these videos is to provide technical guidance “on demand” and address frequently asked questions by both dealers and end-users.

M-C Technical Training

M-C University currently offers ongoing technical training for its dealers’ service and sales personnel. Expanding the training to include video tutorials that will be available all hours of the day was something dealers felt would be extremely important and helpful to their customers, according to Joseph Shulfer, President of Mathews Company. “While dealers will continue to work with end-users directly to resolve service issues, they overwhelmingly said such videos would be a helpful supplement to the service they are committed to providing their customers,” says Shulfer.
The format of the videos will focus on one specific topic in a 4-6 minute segment, and will include topics such as: setting up and installing M-C Trax (M-C’s remote monitoring system), performing a software update as part of a pre-season check-up and calibrating a moisture sensor. The video tutorials are produced at M-C’s in-house video production studio are managed by Mike Wilke, Director of Engineering and Support Services. “We started with this past season’s most common technical service questions, and created a list of videos that would be most helpful to our dealers and customers. Since we can produce these videos in-house and show quick demonstrations with the equipment, the videos can come together quickly,” says Wilke. M-C plans to release a new video topic each week leading up to the busy fall harvest.
M-C Mark of Excellence Dealer, Troy Low of Agri-Sales in Northwood, Iowa is excited that his customers will be able to view the videos 24 hours a day, 7 days a week not only during the busy harvest time, but also at their leisure when customers are just wanting to learn more about their dryer. “Each year, we get inundated with service calls during harvest, typically when customers are starting their dryers up for the first time of the season,” says Low. “If a customer can view a video tutorial, he will get a detailed, tothe-point answer with a visual demonstration. This will save a lot of time, for us and the customer, which we all know is critical during harvest.”
M-C University OnDemand Video Tutorials can be viewed by visiting http://mathewscompany.com/technical-service/m-c-university-ondemand-training-videos/

 


 

Headquartered in Crystal Lake, IL (U.S.A), Mathews Company has been a leading global manufacturer of high quality innovative agriculture equipment, since 1954, specializing in grain drying.
M-C is committed to “Building for the Future,” striving to provide superior products and unmatched service
through innovation, expertise and quality. M-C dryers are available through authorized dealers worldwide.
The company’s web site is www.mathewscompany.com.

Hayden Flour Mills wins Martha Stewart Contest and $10,000

Hayden Flour Mills, an Arizona upstart flour producer of heritage grains, will receive a major publicity push from living mogul Martha Stewart after her company announced Friday that the mill won a national contest focusing on artisanal goods.

The business was named one of 10 winners in the Martha Stewart American Made awards. It will win $10,000 along with exposure in Stewart’s magazine, Martha Stewart Living, as well as on her satellite radio channel and website. There is also an event in New York in early November.

Jeff Zimmerman started his company in 2010 with an idea, the rights to the historic name of the flour, but little else. Piece by piece, he assembled what he needed to create the kind of soft flour he grew up with in the farm country of North Dakota.

Zimmerman found seed specialists who had the kind of heritage wheat varieties that used to flourish in Arizona. He found farmers willing to plant them. He bought a massive stone mill and found a restaurateur, James Beard Award winner Chris Bianco, who had the space for him to house it.

His flour has been sold to several chefs and bakers. It is available on the shelves in a dozen Whole Foods Markets in the Phoenix area, Zimmerman said.

Wheat harvested in Queen Creek, Arizona on Friday, June 29, 2012. Jeff Zimmerman is growing heritage grains and selling them under the old Hayden Flour Mills brand.(Photo: Michael McNamara/The Republic)

Wheat harvested in Queen Creek, Arizona on Friday, June 29, 2012. Jeff Zimmerman is growing heritage grains and selling them under the old Hayden Flour Mills brand.(Photo: Michael McNamara/The Republic)

“The growth is faster than we can handle,” he said.

Zimmerman has moved his mill out of Bianco’s Phoenix bakery and sandwich shop, Pane Bianco, and into temporary quarters in Gilbert.

He is working with farmer Steve Sossaman to create a home for his mill close to some of the land where the wheat is grown. Zimmerman said it will cut trucking and production costs, and serve as a showcase for the milling process. He expects the operation to open in November.

Zimmerman said more farmers are interested in planting the ancient grain varietals. He started with Sossaman and two other farmers planting three varieties of wheat. He now has six farmers planting 14 types.

Zimmerman hopes the organic and heritage flour market can grow like the organic and heritage vegetable market. He is telling bakers they should buy their own mills, even though it would cut into his business, since he believes it will raise interest in the locally sourced wheat.

“A rising tide lifts all boats,” Zimmerman said. “We are close to leading the country with our grain movement.”

by Richard Ruelas, The Republic | azcentral.com 9:44 p.m. MST October 17, 2014

Oilseed Rape Trial Results are Released

The International Milling Directory can reveal the results of the Winter Oilseed Rape Trial Results from the East & West and Northern regions of the UK. As oilseed processing and raw materials make up many of our listed members’ activities such as: ADM Oilseeds, InstaPro International, Vantage Organic Foods Pvt Ltd, these results hint at a very relevant trend towards a good harvest this year, more so in the Northern region but generally positive mean results. The result tables from their website are below:-

 

HGCA results

HGCA results

HGCA results

HGCA results

 

The annual AHDB/HGCA Planting and Variety Survey: 2014’s Harvest

The annual AHDB/HGCA Planting and Variety Survey estimates the total GB area planted to cereals and oilseed rape for harvest this year at 3.91Mha, up 6% from 2013, with the total wheat area at 1.96Mha, up 22%.

Barley and oat areas are down on 2013, while the oilseed rape area for harvest 2014 remains at levels similar to 2013.

AHDB/HGCA Senior Analyst Helen Plant said: “Generally favourable conditions in the autumn of 2013 supported a return to more typical levels of winter crop plantings, after the extremely challenging conditions a year earlier. As generally expected, this has led to a decline in the level of spring cropping. However, it is also worth noting that for some growers the impacts of the extreme 2012 and 2013 seasons continue, because the forced changes to cropping patterns have rotational implications.”

For wheat varieties, the proportion of nabim group 4 varieties continues to increase, accounting for an estimated 58% of the total GB area. Malting barley varieties account for an estimated 60% of the total barley area, while DK-Cabernet remains the most widely grown rapeseed variety for the fourth year running.

Key findings of the survey are:

·          Total GB area planted to cereals and oilseed rape for harvest this year at 3.91Mha, up 6% from 2013

·         Total wheat area at 1.96Mha, up 22% from 2013

·         Total barley plantings down 8% at 1.09Mha but 38% increase in winter barley area

·         Oilseed rape area showing little change from 2013 at 719,000ha

·         GB oat area down 17% to 144,000ha.

 

New for 2014, the planting survey results are available in an interactive format through the HGCA Market Data Centre at: http://www.hgca.com/markets/new-market-data-centre.aspx (also see below for an image).

GB wheat area estimated at 1.96Mha – up 22%

The wheat area in particular has recovered from 2013 levels, when the lowest area since 2001 was harvested. At 1.96Mha, GB wheat planting supports the potential return of the UK to export markets this season, after an absence of two years, subject to final yields and quality.

Although a substantial increase from 2013, a GB wheat area of 1.96Mha is still slightly below that harvested two years ago. Smaller increases in the Eastern and East Midlands regions may reflect an increased interest in spring cropping, linked to efforts to control black-grass and some positive experiences from 2013.

“The proportion of nabim group 4 varieties continues to increase, following the trend of recent years and now account for an estimated 58% of the total GB area,” said Ms Plant. “This increase comes at the expense of nabim group 2 and 3 varieties, which have seen lower premiums over the past season. nabim Group 1 varieties regained area lost due the wet autumn of 2012, accounting for approximately 17% of the area, similar to 2011 and 2012.”

In Scotland, the wheat area is estimated at 109,000ha – an increase of 25% from 2013. This represents the highest level since harvest 2011, when the Scottish wheat area reached a record 115,000ha and, subject to final yields, is likely to result in lower regional premiums than have been seen in the last two seasons.

 

Total barley plantings down 8% on 2013 at 1.09Mha

The total barley planting area for harvest 2014 is estimated at 1.09Mha. While 8% lower than last year, driven by a reduction in spring barley plantings (down 24%), the GB barley area is still larger than those harvested in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

“This is because of a 38% increase in winter barley plantings to 421,000ha, representing the largest GB winter barley area since 2003 and echoing the results of the AHDB/HGCA winter planting survey,” said Ms Plant.

The largest percentage drop in spring barley plantings is seen in the West Midlands, down 56% and returning to 2012 levels. In contrast, Scotland shows the smallest percentage drop in spring barley plantings, down 7% to 276,000ha and accounts for 42% of the GB spring barley area this year.

Overall, malting varieties on the Institute of Brewing and Distilling approved list for harvest 2014, account for 60% of the total GB barley area. However, the final malting availability will be strongly influenced by final yields and quality.

 

Oilseed rape area relatively stable in 2014

The survey indicates a slight increase (1%) to 719,000ha in the area of oilseed rape compared to that for harvest in 2013.

While 5% below the 755,000ha harvested in 2012, the 2014 area would still be the second largest on record. This shows the crop remained popular with growers due to its financial performance over recent seasons and role as a break-crop. However, declines in planting area are noted in some regions possibly due to rotational changes.

DK-Cabernet remains the mostly widely grown variety for the fourth year running, accounting for an estimated 13% of the area in 2014.

 

GB oat area down 17%

The GB oat area is estimated at 144,000ha. This represents a 17% fall from 2013 levels, when the GB oat area reached a 36-year high but is still above the levels seen in some recent years.

The largest declines, in terms of actual area, are seen in the South East (7,000ha) and South West (6,000ha) of England. In Scotland, the area is estimated at 26,000ha, a decline of 6,000ha from 2013, but still the second largest Scottish oat area (after 2013) since 1994.

Ms Plant commented: “Increased milling demand for oats, farmers looking for an alternative cereal crop and the lower variable costs associated with oats compared to some other cereals, may be reasons behind the oat area remaining relatively strong.”

A full analysis will be published in an MI Prospects article on 17th July 2014 at: www.hgca.com/markets.

Map View

Map View from HGCA’s website

A New Horizon for US Wheat Flour Producers

Horizon Milling LLC has announced it will begin producing whole wheat flour at its facility in Kenosha,Wisconsin later this year. The flour miller currently produces whole wheat flour at three facilities including in Ogden, Utah. However, when the project is complete the flour miller will have doubled its current overall whole wheat flour capacity.

A leading U.S. flour miller, Horizon Milling, LLC is a joint venture between CHS Inc. and Cargill. Dan Dye, the company’s President said of the expansion, “This increase in whole wheat capacity reflects consumers’ growing desire to incorporate more whole grains into their diets.”

Whole grains are beneficial because whole grain products deliver important nutrients, such as iron, magnesium, selenium, B vitamins and dietary fiber. In addition, diets rich in whole grains may help to support heart health and a healthy weight

Dye continued, “We are expanding our ability to help our customers formulate great-tasting, wholesome and nutritious products that today’s consumers are seeking for themselves and their families.”

Horizon Milling also offers other products that can help customers meet the growing demand for products rich with whole grain, including GrainWise® wheat aleurone and WheatSelect® white spring whole wheat flour.

 www.horizonmilling.com

www.chsinc.com

www.cargill.com

www.sacbee.com

Never miss a beat with the Global-Milling News

Good morning/evening (dependent on where you are reading joining us from) to our valued readers. Today I would like to draw your attention to our exciting online news-portal that is gathering rapid momentum as well as international milling news.

The Global Milling News sources updates on events, products, company activities and just about any news related to the international milling industry using advanced techniques in news gathering from across the internet. You can even find links to our previous blogs there as well as articles by our associated publications such as Grain & Feed Milling Technology magazine or indeed the Global Miller.

Using the simple drop down menu on the left hand side you can also search for articles related to your specific area of interest using key words such as, Agriculture or Mills and even narrow your search down to key topics such as Soybean Harvest.

The Global-Milling News portal continuously hunts for news and is therefore always updating and it even organizes articles by their relevance and rating to save you the time and the trouble of wading through news that is irrelevant to you. This can be even more tailored to your needs simply by subscribing to the RSS feed where the news can be sent directly to you.

So don’t miss out and check it out now at www.global-milling.com.

Pssst… Just to let you know, you can even submit news to us here at Perendale where we will distribute and expose it across the cyber world. So why not give it a try and send us a press release at info@perendale.co.uk.

[slideshow]

 

UK Grains Harvest 2012: What we already knew…

The global price of wheat has increased by an astounding 30% over the past 12 months – which according to the UK based National Farmers Union (NFU), has put massive pressure on farmers who buy grain to feed their livestock.

NFU President Peter Kendal was discussing the worst wheat growth in the UK since the 1980’s when he said, “The challenge for the pig and poultry market is trying to make sure that retailers pay a fair price, because in pigs 50% of the cost is grain, poultry it’s 60% – and these farmers at the moment, because the prices haven’t responded yet, they’re actually saying I’m not going to fill my sheds with poultry or pigs any more.”

The problems faced by farmers in the UK and the global increase in wheat prices are both adding to fears over rises in food prices reports the BBC News wesbsite. But The extreme weather has taken its toll on the amount of food produced and the quality of food and grain.

Martyn Jones, from the Morrisons supermarket chain, said that, for example, carrots were not quite as sweet as previous years, and the available volumes of some food was down – about 25% across most potatoes and root crops.

The worst hit areas in the UK this summer were in the South-West where a huge proportion of  UK crops are produced. Ian Johnson, south-west England spokesman for the NFU, said this year’s weather had led to a “mixed picture” for arable farmers.

He said while wheat crops had suffered, winter barley yields were up 1.6%; spring barley yields were down 7.4% and oilseed rape yields were up 5.9%.

But still for some such as Paul Harris, an arable farmer in Dorset, the difficulties look set to continue. He said, “I’ve been farming now for 40 years and it’s the worst harvest I have ever known.”

More about NFU

Late Harvest Not Worth the Weight?

POOR specific weights stand out in provisional results from the HGCA Cereal Quality Survey for 2012 reports Farmers Guardian (FG). Wheat average specific weight figures are down considerably on those seen in recent seasons.

According to the report the average specific weight for harvest to date is considerably lower than in recent seasons, at 71.9kg/hl against 78.7kg/hl in 2011 and a three-year average of 77.5kg/hl.

Average specific weights in the South East are 72.1kg/hl, were down 6.8 per cent on the three-year average and in the East 72.2kg/hl, that deficit is 7.4 per cent – some of the lowest on record since 1977.

The average Hagberg Falling Number (HFN) for harvest to date is 267 seconds, compared with 269 in 2011, which has been lower than average so far. But,”has been within acceptable levels” according to HGCA market specialist Charlotte Garbutt.

However FG has suggested that early results show protein levels are slightly higher, although there is a bias towards quality wheats (59 per cent of the wheat samples included in the provisional results came from NABIM groups 1 and 2).

Average protein content for harvest to date is 12.7 per cent, compared with 12 per cent for final 2011 results and the three- year average of 11.8 per cent.

The results indicate that 26 per cent of the 4,032 NABIM group 1 and 2 samples received met a medium quality bread wheat specification (74kg/hl specific weight, 180 HFN, 12.5 per cent protein) but only 4 per cent of group 1 samples met full bread milling specifications.

Mrs Garbutt said, “The overriding reason for such a low achievement of full specification is the specific weight quality criteria.

“Only 17 per cent of all NABIM group 1 samples collected for 2012 to date have achieved 76kg/hl, compared to 92 per cent last year.”

According to FG the provisional 2012 estimates for barley show a lower specific weight and poorer screenings compared to a year ago but nitrogen content levels are better.

www.farmersguardian.com

www.hgca.com

UK Farmers A-Maized by Wet Weather

The weather strikes again this time with rain putting a dampener on the UK maize harvest according to experts. Farmers Weekly has reported that the harvesting schedule for most farmers across the UK has been put back by up to four weeks already, and the rain looks set to continue as autumn sets in.

It all seems a little too familiar t last year’s harvest where poor weather again affected harvesting in the UK, not to mention the severe and catastrophic drought across the Atlantic ocean. Richard Camplin of Limagrain UK said, “If we get warm, persistent weather it will give the cobs a chance to mature and for growers to harvest mid- to late October. However, if we get prolonged periods of rain in October, it could lead to problems getting machinery on the field.”

And continued, “”Two bad years for maize could lead those on the margins of growing maize to consider other things, such as whole-crop, but people shouldn’t be hasty if they are thinking about moving away from maize.”

It has been well documented that the trade price of maize, cereals and grains has been inflated as a result of the varying extremes in weather for 2012, but more-strict quality control means that farmers and millers have been under added pressure against the elements.

Neil Groom of Grainseed has described this ‘mixed-bag’ of crops as having lots of variation occurring even within fields. “We have seen a wide range of crops from normal to very poor, and that can be in the same fields.

He has also suggested that the heavy moisture has and will continue to enhance the risk of diseases and severe conditions in the fields, he said “Poor soil management has also been evident this year, whether due to compaction or inadequate drainage in the soil. The rain has also caused leaching of nitrogen, leaving the crops hungry in many cases.”

And continued,  “Eyespot has been an issue throughout the South West and West coast. If eyespot has moved on to your crop within the last week, get out there and put a fungicide on. It needs to be put on at least one month prior to harvest,” he said.

www.fwi.co.uk

European Harvest: August 3rd, 2012.

FarmingUK reports that EU grains finished mixed with Nov 12 London wheat down £0.50/tonne to £188.50/tonne and Nov 12 Paris wheat up €0.75/tonne to €256.00/tonne.
InterFax have also said that Russia’s total 2012/13 grain exports are now estimated at 12 MMT versus the previous estimate of 16 MMT.
The USDA attaché in Russia estimates Russia’s 2012 grain crop significantly higher at 81.0 MMT, including 47 MMT of wheat, 15 MMT of barley and 7.5 MMT of corn. Grain exports are pegged at 15.0 MMT, including 11 MMT of wheat, 2 MMT of barley, and 1.5 MMT of corn.
UK harvesting of winter barley and oilseed rape started about 7-10 days later than normally expected with about 40% of the winter barley and almost 20% of the winter oilseed rape area harvested by 31 July, mostly in the south according to the HGCA with wheat harvesting expected to commence in just over a week.

They said, “Early indications are that UK winter barley yields are close to average at around 6.3 MT/ha with improved yields from normal on light land. Quality is variable,”

“Early indications are that UK rapeseed yields are close to the five year average at around 3.5 MT/ha, lower than the record yield of 3.9 MT/ha in 2011,” they conclude.

Meanwhile the German Farmers Union (DBV) say that the winter barley harvest there is nearly complete, with yields averaging 6.3 MT/ha. The rapeseed harvest is around 70% done with yields averaging 3.3 MT.ha, they add.