2012 to 2014…VIV China 2014 set for success

The International Milling Directory, as part of Perendale Publishers, proud to be an official media partner of VIV China 2014.

VIV China: from Feed to Meat
In its role as the nation’s platform on animal production and meat processing, VIV China showcases the industry’s developments by the Feed to Meat concept. Feed to meat brings together supply and demand within the complete animal protein chain. The driver behind the chain concept is that animal feed and animal health are vital for meat quality and safety. VIV China will represent every step in the meat production process. Related topics will be featured in the VIV China Conference.

In 2012, the last time VIV China was held, the organising team led by Ruwan Berculo, made plans for this year’s events. They have come around to be right on plan and built on the solid foundations of 2012. Milling for animal feed is a large part of the event and the Chinese market has grown since 2012. Let’s take a look back to the report from 2012:–

VIV China has once again profiled itself as an international platform for products, knowledge and technology for the Chinese animal protein production industry. Following many positive reactions to the event, project manager Ruwan Berculo concludes that the new concept is a success and can act as a blueprint for the next exhibition. The next VIV China is planned for 2014, from 23-25 September. “A compact, high-quality exhibition with a high visitor level, many international delegations, people from emerging economies and a Chinese business audience specifically attracted by innovations,” Berculo summarises afterwards. “You could feel the amazing energy in the air. The enthusiasm and the interest have reinforced our idea that this is what the animal protein industry in China needs. With very well-attended congresses, seminars and receptions parallel to the exhibition, we created a network meeting that counts. Moreover, the atmosphere was great. The top and sub top of the industry have attended; so 13,874 visitors is a high score.”

VIV China received delegations from the Middle East, Russia and South East Asia, among others. The exhibitors were full of praise about the new approach. According to Ruwan Berculo, for Chinese exhibitors, the exhibition was the perfect method to present themselves to the world. The Dutch delegation was also prominent, also due to the co-operating businesses in the poultry sector, the Dutch Poultry Centre. In the words of president Jos Ramekers it was a very successful exhibition, judging by the many contacts established with Chinese interested parties. On behalf of the Product Board Animal Feed, Tjeerd den Hollander said: “The VIV-summit was a very successful exposure for our project for comparing the feed import legislation of China and the EU. As a result of the summit we received lots of positive comments and reflection on our project, which gave us useful information for the finalisation of the project.”

More positive reactions about the International China Summit followed, including from Jeroen Leffelaar, Global Head Animal Protein at Rabobank: “The strong attendance at the International China Summit proved once again that Chinese professionals in animal protein production are very committed to being updated on trends and developments in their industry. In co-operation with VIV, we created an excellent opportunity to share our visions with these valuable relations.” Marleen Boerjan of Pas Reform also speaks highly of the result of the seminars: “During the seminar we provided the most up-to-date information on modular single stage incubation. We are very grateful to VIV for their support and hospitality in hosting this event and to the hatchery professionals who attended. All their questions and involvement made it such an interesting and successful occasion. We look forward to the next seminar”. The first edition of the International China Summit, on Saturday preceding the exhibition, was attended by 266 delegates. The parallel seminars on this day as well as the Closing Plenary Conference were also extremely popular and attracted large audiences.

In addition to the International China Summit, the Food Safety Poultry Forum on Friday September 21 was also well-attended. Poultry International China Edition and WATT also attracted over 100 interested visitors with a series of leading speakers. Greg Watt, President/CEO at WATT, immediately stated his wish to repeat this valuable meeting prior to VIV China 2014. The last congress was organised by the Chinese Association of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine (CAAV) on the second exhibition day in the NCIEC. The Beijing International Breeding Pig Industry Development Symposium attracted 300 Chinese and international delegates. Initiator Mr Machuang, Director International Affairs at CAAV, looks back on this success with great pleasure.

 

Many print copies of the International Milling Directory will be on display at Perendale’s stand W1.G078 so do make sure you can visit the stand!

The Grain Chain

The International Milling Directory is glad to promote a video from The Grain Chain. The Grain Chain programme is a collaboration of the HGCA, Federation of Bakers (FoB) and Flour Advisory Bureau (FAB). It is the successor to the Flour and Grain Education Programme which was launched in 2002. The International Milling Directory always supports training and wishes to promote this further in any small way at all.

Logo GrainChain - Natural resource for teachers

The Grain Chain

 

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wyhzKX97Vk]


The transformation of wheat seeds into flour. See the grain during different stages of the milling process and the machines that crush, grind, sift and separate the grain to give us flour, bran and wheat feed.”

Grainchain.com is a curriculum linked education resource for teachers and parents to inform school-aged children about the story of grain-based food – from the farm to mill to plate. Find tailored teaching materials, worksheets, videos, quizzes, recipes and activities about farming, milling and baking.

 

‘It’s about meeting the growing demand for better food’

VIV Europe 2014 has a strong feed flavour

Feed forms a focal point of VIV Europe 2014. Global developments in the composition and manufacturing of feeds will feature strongly at this international trade show. “We always cover the agribusiness spectrum from feed to meat in every VIV event. But Utrecht in May will underline the feed aspect in several ways,” confirms exhibition manager Ruwan Berculo. “For example, when our visitors arrive at the show they will find that a hall near to the main entrance contains displays by all the leading suppliers of feed manufacturing technology as well as for companies marketing ingredients and additives. A second hall only about a minute away on foot will have more nutritional products on show.”

GITP20100421VIV1070

Extend automation further into the process

Preliminary calculations tell us that there will be more than 40 exhibitors with machinery or equipment for feed mills. In addition about 15 companies supplying feed manufacturing systems will be represented on the stands forming a special pavilion. In addition global suppliers will shine their light on the profitability and competitiveness of feed manufacturing, by offering a view of how automation can be extended further into the processes of the mill. Ruwan continues: “Everyone in the feed business can gain from the knowledge shared during the various sessions as well as from seeing the innovations at display.“

It is something that has been emphasised repeatedly in the series of VIV Europe Roadshows which travelled around the world to promote the main event this spring. The directors and managers of feed manufacturing companies that attended these Roadshows have already made plans to attend the show in May, because of its strong feed flavour.

Intensification has to be sustainable

“We primarily aim to be a platform for all of the leading technology and know-how in the field of animal protein production in growth countries that currently have the greatest need for this. In addition, we of course also focus our range of solutions on major European countries and the United States in order to achieve even more innovative and higher quality livestock, meat and egg production systems in those countries – all of course with clear preconditions for sustainability because the world has now discovered that intensification has to be sustainable. This is something we are already seeing in the far afield countries, where there is more interest in animal welfare and food safety than you may imagine. Meeting the growing need for animal protein products is not just simply a case of even bigger and more intensive.GITP20100421VIV0515

With the theme of ‘sustainability’ Berculo is alluding to the misconception that this only relates to organic production. “It’s about answering the question about how we can meet the growing demand for better food and how we can develop that in a sustainable manner, throughout the world. What is required for that and meets the latest requirements will be here at the show. We have what has never been on show before, like we’ve promised.”

Attending VIV Europe is free upon registration. Please click here for your free ticket.

VIV Europe 2014

VIV Europe 2014

 

133.6kg/capita – Setting a global benchmark for feed production — Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert was invited to participate on the recent round of VIV Roadshows, speaking in Abuja, Nigeria at the beginning of January 2014 and more recently at the IPPE’s VIV Pig Production Summit USA. His topic was: ‘The role of a robust compound feed to meet the needs of a growing world population’ and based on survey results from Alltech’s feed survey showing world production in 2013 at 963 million tonnes. 

Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert

Looking at production statistics and population figures in isolation does not provide us with a clear view of where we have come from and where we are likely to end up in a world that is being challenged to feed itself adequately.

Static figures do not encourage us to address issues that are looming.
I’m of the view that information is knowledge, knowledge brings responsibility, and together provides us with influence and power to bring about change. If we ‘know’ we have a responsibility to ‘act’.

Nigeria represents one of the few countries on the planet that is adding substantially and significantly to its population base. In the next decade it is projected by the US Census Bureau to add 50 million people to its current 177 million population base and by 2050 challenge the USA for the third most populated country at just under 400 million people! It’s an issue that our industry, and the food industry in general – both in Nigeria and globally – will have to address.

Nigeria is just one example, an extreme one, of what is likely to happen in developing countries over the next 35 years.

However, there is good news for Africa. From the FAO, and surveying the first 12 years of the 21st century, Africa IS increasing its production of foodstuffs faster than anywhere else on the planet. The area being harvested is increasing at twice the rate of that of any other region while two regions – the Americas and Europe – show no increase in area harvested at all.

Product quality is also improving at the fastest rate in this region while yield increases are matching those being achieved in the America and Asia.

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Nigeria population growth

While world food production growth is increasing on average at 2.1 percent per year, Africa is moving ahead at 3.5 percent – and Nigeria is in amongst the countries achieve these higher-than-average increases.

Food consumption per capita based on an index of 2004-06, shows Africa achieving the fastest and most sustained growth rising from 78kg/head to 117kg/head since 1992.

As we are addressing compound feed production it is interesting to see what is happening to the consumption of meat and eggs. Total food supply has doubled in that period to 1.4 million tonnes and per capita consumption of meat up from 7.4kg/head to almost 9kg/head.

That in fact, highlights the next point I wish to make. How can ‘meat’ supply double yet per head consumption rise by less than 20%? The answer is straightforward – population increase. And that is why grams/day consumption of ‘meat’ products (in protein and fat terms) has largely stagnated in Nigeria since 1997.

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Nigeria population growth

By comparison world food supply has also shown a steady upward trend, increasing by almost 1/5th over a 20 year period.

However, in contrast to that, world per capita consumption has fallen from a high of 151kg on average to 146.5kg. No much you might think in terms of total weight, but the additional population over that period is having an impact and we are likely to see this downward trend continue.

And based on consumption per person, the supply of protein in our diets is showing a steady decline as well. On average we are consuming a gram less protein per person per day. Again not significant you might think, but highlights an ongoing tend that can only accelerate.

Fat consumption on the other hand remains relatively unchanged, at between 5.9-6g/head per day. Possibly reflecting the tremendous increase in palm production throughout Asia over recent decades.

Population pyramids

I want to show here how developing country populations are going to increase – again based on figures from the US Census Bureau. I have compared them to the country I live in – the UK – for comparison. You’ll notice that Nigeria has a wider population base compared to the UK (which given the total difference in numbers, is only natural). Also, the UK shows a ‘bulge’ in the 40-60 year olds groups due in part to the baby boomers following the Second World War. What is also evident is the increased number of people living longer in the UK than their counterparts in Nigeria.

As we move ahead through time – to 2030 – the Nigerian population base has widened by an additional 8-10 million births in the 0-4 age group (with a total of 38 million) while the shape of the pyramid remains the same; and with no more people living longer. In the UK on the other hand the population base has remained largely unchanged while even more people are living longer.

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World food supply

Finally, by 2050, the year in which it’s calculated the world will reach 9.5 billion people on the planet, and before stabalising at around 10 billion for the remainder of the century, Nigeria, while maintaining its pyramid shape, will once more see its population base expand, this time adding almost 70 million people in one-to-four year olds!  Again the UK is largely unchanged with a static population base.

These are in general the two key trends that differenciate between today’s developed countries and those ‘developing’.

Global feed production

I’m basing my comments on the latest Alltech Survey 2013 which provides output figures up until December 2013: the most comprehensive available for our industry worldwide and which we should be grateful to have.

The world currently manufacturers annually just under a billion metric tonnes of compounded or formulated animal feed. These feed statistics were collected by 600 Alltech staff from 130 countries involving 28,196 feedmills. Note: Numbers for less developed countries may be less accurate; but that will have little influence on overall dataset.

The top 10 countries in descending order of output are: China, USA, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, India, Russia, Japan, Germany and France which account for 611 million tonnes or two-thirds of world production.

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global feed
production 2013

Poultry, which includes layers, broilers, turkeys and others, account for 444.4 million tonnes of feeds while pigs account for 242.8 million tonnes and ruminants – dairy, beef, calves and others – 195.6 million tonnes.

Key survey findings include:

  • China leading producer at 189 million tons
  • Asia leading overall region with 348 million
  • US and Brazil 2nd and 3rd largest countries
  • Africa fastest growing region; up 7%
  • Middle East has largest feed mills by annual production

Other key findings:

  • Poultry still the leading species
  • 46% of all feed is poultry feed, 61% of that is for broilers
  • 444.4 million tons fed to poultry worldwide
  • Aqua experienced fastest growth up 17% over 2012 – exceeded 40 million tons.
  • Pig feed production increased 11% (esp. China)
  • Pet food up slightly, Equine up 14%
  • Ruminant feed production declined 20%
  • Decline in both Beef and Dairy
  • Able to switch to forages when grain prices high
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Global feed production 2013

The 16 important countries in terms of feed production are ranked in the bar chart above because I want to make the point that countries producing more feed do not necessarily have more feedmills. In fact, this chart is ranked by countries on the left with the least feed mills to the most on the right. And what is really interesting is that the average production from feedmills is not too dissimilar between countries and between regions at 30,000-60,000 tonnes per year.

A developing country’s prospects

Nigeria ranks 54 out of the 133 countries surveyed, in terms of total formulated feed production at 1.9 million tonnes (this does not include home-produced feeds or feeding straights or unformulated feeds). I’d like to extrapolate some figures from the information presented and raise a question or two for you to ponder.

  1. What are the populations of other countries producing a similar amount of feed to Nigeria?
  2. How much feed is being produced by those countries with similar populations?

The reason I ask these questions is that I believe there is a correlation between the volume of compound feed produced in a country and the ability of that country to feed its population adequately.

And I have identified a ‘benchmark’ that I believe all countries need to exceed in order to claim they are providing the nutritional requirements for their populations.

As FAO and other UN organisations, including their associated NGOs, demonstrate safe and affordable food supply is not the responsibility of those with commercial interests alone to fulfill; there is a need for governments to assume responsibility in ensuring food is produced in volumes that are safe and affordable for all.

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Global feed production 2013

Here, I show Nigeria’s total population in 2014 alongside the volume in tonnes of its compound feed production (just under 2 million tonnes). I’ve compared that to other countries producing approximately two million tonnes of compound feed and show here the populations those countries feed.

If my proposal has any substance, then the people of Bosnia will be enjoying a healthy diet of livestock and fish products than their counterparts in Sweden or Czech Republic. Or they are enjoying healthier incomes from export sales.

When comparing Nigeria’s 177 million population of today with similarly populated countries we can compare their compound feed production; it is quickly evident that Nigeria is faring no better than Bangladesh and is a long way behind a country like Brazil.

For every Nigerian to enjoy the ‘world average’ supply of animal proteins based on compound feed, then the Nigerian Feed Industry has to rise to the challenge and lift production from 1.9 million tonnes to 23.6 million tonnes annually: over a 10-fold increase on what it is producing now.
Give our industry a chance

Click to expand
Top ten countries

I believe that scientifically-formulated compound feeds offer the solution to this world feeding itself adequately by 2050.

We not only have to meet the future needs of humans arriving on the planet, but we also have to meet the needs of those wanting to improve their diets as they become more economically advanced. On top of that we have to address the one billion people FAO tells us are receiving less food than is required to sustain themselves. That figure has not been diminishing, but increasing in recent years.

You may not believe that growing livestock and fish for protein is the way forward however, growing and consuming cereals and crops has not proven to be the complete answer either. Livestock and fish have many advantages in the production of protein for human consumption over grains and cereals (which we cannot go into here) and we should give this industry a chance to prove itself as it offers huge utilization and conversion efficiencies yet to be fully realized.

Unless we measure where we are we cannot set meaningful ‘benchmarks’ for ourselves or our industry for the future.

Alltech’s figures are the first comprehensive figures the industry has on just how much compounded feed is being produced and used. Based on these figures and our current world population, I put it to you that each country must set an annual benchmark that sees every citizen having access to food that is based on 133.6kg/head of scientifically-formulated compound feed.

After all, that’s the world average and every country should be striving to be equal to or rise above the average in terms of supplying safe and affordable food to its people.

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AFIA Supports New AMS/FDA Animal Feed Export Certification Programme

ARLINGTON, Va., February 20, 2014 — The American Feed Industry Association is pleased with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s new agreement that designates USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) as the authority to certify animal feed and pet food products for export to foreign countries.

“The agreement is a result of AFIA’s efforts to inform USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service about several issues that industry has had exporting to various markets, such as Brazil’s requirement for Good Manufacturing Practice certifications and products under the implementation of China’s AQSIQ Decree 118,” said Gina Tumbarello, AFIA manager of international trade. “The need to find a feed export certification solution for the increasingly popular requirements being put out by several countries ultimately led to these government agencies coming together to develop an agreement that would allow AMS to serve as the competent authority for feeds and register, audit and certify feed facilities as needed based on foreign requirements.”
AMS was selected to lead the programme due to its experience in working with stakeholders to develop export certification programmes that meet the specific requirements of foreign countries. The agreement was modeled after a previous USDA/FDA agreement on processed egg programmes.

USDA. Photo source: Wikipedia

USDA. Photo source: Wikipedia

 

“This agreement is a big step toward helping U.S. feed exporters take advantage of the growing global demand for these products,” said AMS Administrator Anne Alonzo.

The agency now has the ability to certify a wide range of animal feed products, including pet food and treats, dried distillers’ grains with solubles, mixed-ingredient feeds and feed additives.

The programme will not be implemented across the board for all feed and feed ingredient products to all markets.

English: Logo of the U.S. Food and Drug Admini...

Instead, it will be addressed on a country-by-country basis. AFIA will help identify markets where the feed, feed ingredient and pet food industries are currently experiencing export difficulties related to certifications on foreign requirements. AMS will then work with the foreign government to determine if there is an opportunity for AMS to fulfill the requirements. The hope is for AMS to develop a programme and certificate that could be used across several export market requirements, rather than creating a separate certificate for each market.

Steps are already underway to use this programme to address certification requirements for processed plant-based feed products under China’s AQSIQ Decree 118 and AFIA looks forward to future opportunities to use this new mechanism for certification of feed and pet food products for export in other markets.

AFIA has been supportive of the USDA/FDA agreement since its early stages of development. The organization plans to work collaboratively with AMS, FDA and other representatives from the feed, grain and pet food industries as this programme develops.

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HGCA and nabim: 2014 Milling Wheat Challenge annouced!

nabim

nabim

The International Milling Directory’s sister magazine, Grain & Feed Milling Technology, covered the Milling Wheat Challenge last year. There is excitement in the announcement of this year’s competition. Launched by nabim and HGCA in the United Kingdom once again, we hope many users of the International Milling Directory appreciate this news and content; a blog from the HGCA below:–

nabim, supported by HGCA, has launched the fifth Milling Wheat Challenge competition to find the UK’s outstanding grower of quality milling wheat.

HGCA

HGCA

Martin Savage, nabim‘s Trade Policy Manager said “The competition has gone from strength to strength. In the past four years, it has discovered an amazing group of finalists who are at the forefront of UK wheat production. The winners have each shown that they are progressive in their business as well as their crop husbandry and that they can consistently grow quality crops of bread-making wheats.”

The competition has become established as a way for Britain’s flour millers to formally recognise the value of the country’s best growers to the processing trade.

We are committed to working with UK wheat growers and we are looking for farmers who combine attention to detail with end-customer awareness and business acumen to create a win: win for the whole wheat chain” Martin said.

“Growing quality wheat consistently is a difficult task which requires best practice in growing, storage and delivery to meet the exacting standards of the milling trade.”

HGCA is pleased to be supporting the competition as a way of promoting best practice in both the growing and the marketing of milling wheat. Richard Laverick from HGCA said: “Our aim is to find growers who have a good understanding of their end market, their business costs and an ability to reflect both in their marketing of milling wheat.”

Entry forms are available via the nabim and HGCA websites. The closing date for entries will be Friday, 2 May 2014 and the three finalists will be announced at the Cereals Event on 11 June. On-farm judging of the finalists will take place in late June. The competition judges are Martin Savage from nabim, Richard Laverick from HGCA and Mark Ireland, a Lincolnshire Farmer and former “Farmers Weekly Arable Farmer of the Year”.

The three finalists in the 2013 Milling Wheat Challenge were Stephen Craggs, East Close Farm, Sedgefield, Stockton-on-Tees, James Loder-Symonds, Denne Hill Farm, Womenswold, Canterbury, Kent and Nick & David Philip, Church Farm, Waltham St Lawrence, Reading, Berkshire. The overall winner was Stephen Craggs.

Mark Ireland said that “All three finalists were very good producers of quality wheat” and he added that what set Stephen Craggs apart was his total commitment to detail. “Despite faming with a challenging climate he has developed a simple yet robust system to produce consistent quality. On top of a very strong business, his technical insight and attention to detail gave him the edge. He also has a very rational approach to risk management as well as a proactive approach to going beyond the basics of what a miller wants from a grower.”

Martin Savage urged growers to enter the competition, explaining: “The Challenge is a great way for growers to engage with the supply chain. UK flour millers remain committed to our farmers.”

The finalists, their partners and an additional guest, together with leaders from the UK wheat supply chain, will be invited to a celebration dinner hosted by nabim in October at the Ritz Hotel in London where the overall winner will be announced.

Major Australian Poultry Processor Contracts for Battelle’s PRIA™ to Help Fight Salmonella and Campylobacter Outbreaks, Improve Food

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Jan. 27, 2014)—Battelle’s unique software modeling program, PRIA, will soon be put to use in Australia to help manage the risk of salmonella and campylobacter outbreaks in poultry.

Baiada Poultry is one of Australia’s largest poultry companies, providing products throughout the country. Battelle will customize the software for Baiada, which will integrate it into operations.

View a video about Battelle’s PRIA software. “A recent Consumer Reports investigation in the U.S. found contamination in 97 percent of the chicken it tested,” said Battelle Research Leader Brian Hawkins. “Clearly it’s a risk for the companies around the world trying to provide safe products, and to the consumer who wants to eat safe food.”

Baiada’s Anthony Pavic, Chief Scientific Officer and Regulatory Affairs Manager, said he believes PRIA is the right tool that will help improve on current methods. “PRIA will let us move away from spread sheets and let us perform high quality assessments that are quicker, more mathematically robust, and better documented for regulatory purposes.”

PRIA, which stands for Probabilistic Risk Informed Analysis, is a software and modeling tool that allows food safety and defense professionals to proactively assess the effectiveness of mitigation strategies—before an event occurs.

The software was inspired by concepts developed by Battelle. As part of its expertise in working on chemical and biological defense, scientists and engineers have worked to evaluate planned responses to incidents ranging from biological and chemical attacks in public gatherings to the purposeful contamination of a water supply.

PRIA uses powerful mathematical algorithms to perform rapid simulations that take into account all the variables involved in the process, down to the granular level in order to help pinpoint areas of risk.

While currently customized for the poultry processing industry, PRIA can be adapted to address other foods with common contamination concerns, such as those that occur in the leafy greens and beef industries. PRIA is an effective, quantitative software tool for food companies to align with future regulations calling for risk-based assessments, such as those anticipated in the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

About Battelle

Every day, the people of Battelle apply science and technology to solving what matters most.

At major technology centers and national laboratories around the world, Battelle conducts research and development, designs and manufactures products, and delivers critical services for government and commercial customers. Headquartered in Columbus, Ohio since its founding in 1929, Battelle serves the national security, health and life sciences, and energy and environmental industries. For more information, visit www.battelle.org.

Media Contacts

For more information contact Katy Delaney at (614) 424-7208 or delaneyk@battelle.org, or

T.R. Massey at (614) 424-5544 or masseytr@battelle.org.

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Bühler milling training

Welcome to Bühler world of training & services.

 

Training Center with its own school mill

In project- and subject-related courses, experienced Bühler experts will teach your personnel the knowledge they need to run your specific plant and equipment. The training courses are held in English, German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Other languages like Russian and Japanese are available upon request. The length of training courses depends on the basic knowledge of the personnel to be trained, the training objectives, and the size of your production facility. In addition to project-related courses, we also offer special intensive courses for customers’ management staff. The course programs are created on the basis of the course participants’ needs and goals. Efficient plant operation is a prerequisite for achieving high extraction rates and optimal end product quality. The Training Center operates its own school mill, a generously equipped workshop including all the important machines, and instruction rooms with modern amenities. The adjacent factory with the research center and laboratories offers perfect support in training.

For more information click here

 

 

Bühler Grain Technology Center

The Bühler Grain Technology Center is the world’s best-equipped and most renowned development and test center in the field of industrial processing of grain and pulses. Its extensive, state-of-the-art range of equipment allows commercial-scale simulations of processes such as storage, unloading, conveying, weighing, feeding, separating, grinding, grading, blending & mixing, pelleting, flaking, bagging,

hydrothermal treatment, and a large number of others. They are available together with the entire extensive know-how of the Buhler technologists for conducting tests and investigations, for example feasibility studies, product development, and performance tests.

• For more information click here

 

Bakery Innovation Center
As competence center for Flour Service, the Bakery Innovation Center (BIC) offers unique services in grain and flour analytics as well as expertise in flour and baking ingredients. The exceptional infrastructure of the BIC includes state-of-the-art bakery technology equipment as well as in-depth and comprehensive analytical services. How can you achieve an optimal and consistent flour quality? And how can you differentiate yourself in the marketplace by offering specialty flours and innovative product concepts? The experts of the Bakery Innovation Center deal in depth with such issues, developing customized and sustainable solutions for the global grain processing food industry. In addition to ta

ilor-made product and process solutions, the BIC also offers training courses. Benefit from the BIC specialists’ flour expertise by continuing your training and optimize your flour quality on the basis of innovative solutions.

• For more information click here

EuroTier 2012: Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize

On November 13th 2012, at EUROTIER tradeshow, The European Probiotic Association (EPA) awarded the Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize 2012 to Peter de Schryver, from Ghent University, for his innovative research project on the use of microbial products and microorganisms in animal nutrition. The Prize was awarded in presence of members of the EPA, FEFANA, representative of the EPA Scientific Committee and journalists. Altogether, the quality and diversity of research projects submitted demonstrate that probiotics benefits go beyond zootechnical performance and pave the way for innovative applications in the field of immunity, but also stress management or even reproduction.

From left to right : J. Brufau (EPA Scientific Committee), E. Auclair (EPA Treasurer), P. de Schryver and L. Dussert (EPA President). 

The aim of the EPA Jules Tournut Prize is to support research and innovation in the field of probiotics for animal nutrition. Professor Joaquim Brufau, from IRTA, who represented EPA Scientific Committee, which formed the judging panel of the award, highlighted the scientific quality and diversity of applications explored by the candidates, who came from all over the world, beyond the boundary of Europe. The studies submitted covered a range of target species and benefits, sign of the broad potential of probiotics for sustainable animal production.

Peter de Schryver’s project aimed at improving performance and welfare in aquaculture thanks to an original approach: the use of poly-β- hydroxybutyrate (PHB), which he describes as a microbial energy storage polymer, an important source of energy for bacteria. PHB thus appears to play a prebiotic role in aquatic species, resulting in improved performance and resistance to pathogens. By combining this compound to a probiotic bacteria (synbiotic approach), the young researcher showed that both agents had a synergistic effect to protect fish against pathogens (use of Artemia franciscana as a well-studied model of aquaculture specie).

Nevertheless, when asked if this new approach could be applied to various species Peter de Schryver reckons that “it could certainly work in land farmed animals that have an even more developed digestive system”. The use of PHB in synbiotic approach for animal nutrition thus appears as a promising field.

Moreover, the young researcher is convinced that, especially in aquaculture, the digestive microbiota is often underestimated. Another interesting aspect of his study is that he looked into the Artemia microbiota richness and diversity and found that PHB had a positive effect on the microbiota diversity and evenness, an asset for microflora stability and protection against pathogens

www.engormix.com

The Alltech Poultry Seminar

With high feed costs, increased government regulations and consumer demands intensifying, the future of the poultry industry is difficult to predict. This was the focus of Alltech’s 10th Poultry Solutions Seminar, held in Hannover, Germany on the 12th of November, where a number of distinguished poultry industry experts gave presentations on their cutting edge research and on the issues that they believe will be of most importance.

Antibiotic resistance is getting more and more publicity and governments are starting  to take notice. Dr. Marcel Boereboom, of the Royal Dutch Society for Veterinary Medicine, discussed the impact this is having on the Dutch industry, following a study by the Dutch Health Council. He described how the government of the Netherlands have, to date, banned certain antibiotics and implemented a targeted reduction of 50% (of 2009 levels) of the total amount of antibiotics used in food producing animals by 2013. This has had a huge impact on how poultry is produced.

Focussing on how to deal with this issue was Professor Stephen Collett from the University of Georgia. He recommended a shift in emphasis in gut health management, from working against pathogens, to working with the intestinal microbial community. This involves improving performance by accelerating the evolution and maintaining the stability of favourable intestinal microbiota. The three most important areas of an effective intestinal health management programme include: “seeding” the gut with favourable organisms, “feeding” the favourable organisms and “weeding” out the unfavourable organisms.

Professor Roselina Angel, of the University of Maryland, described to attendees at the Poultry Solutions Seminar research on how neonatal conditioning, resulting in epigenetic changes shows great promise in terms of improving phosphorus (P) utilisation. “By applying a moderate P deficiency in young chicks, the bird is conditioned to utilise P more efficiently throughout its life. The timing of the conditioning is critical and requires a clear understanding of skeletal growth, the main driver of calcium (Ca) and P requirements,” she explained.

Controlling campylobacter, a bacteria that poses no danger to poultry, but is the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, was the topic of Professor Frank Pasmans’ presentation, researched at Ghent University. When a single bird is infected, the infection spreads quickly through the flock, resulting in the majority of birds being colonised within only a few days after Campylobacter entry. He explained how, overall, the outlook is bleak if the flock has been infected but results of recent studies, using oral administration of bovine or chicken immunoglobulins of hyper-immunised animals and the use of bacteriocins to limit caecal colonisation, look promising. “We are still quite a way from commercialised products but the future does seem to be positive,” he explained.

To deal with unpredictable feed costs and an inconsistent supply, Professor David Roland of Auburn University,  recommends his “econometric approach to the feeding of layers. “Feeding correctly is challenging because nutrient requirements and dietary levels needed for optimal returns are continually changing” said Prof. Roland as he opened his talk.

He presented his calculation tool called Econometrics to attendees, demonstrating how optimal econometric feeding can improve performance, returns and help regulate feed and egg prices at the same time.

For a more detailed account of the talks at the Solutions Seminars visit www.alltech.com/blog