Mathews Company Launches OnDemand Video Tutorials

Crystal Lake, IL – Mathews Company (M-C), a global manufacturer of grain dryers, is launching a series of video tutorials on its website and YouTube® channel as an extension of its M-C University Technical Training program. The purpose of these videos is to provide technical guidance “on demand” and address frequently asked questions by both dealers and end-users.

M-C Technical Training

M-C University currently offers ongoing technical training for its dealers’ service and sales personnel. Expanding the training to include video tutorials that will be available all hours of the day was something dealers felt would be extremely important and helpful to their customers, according to Joseph Shulfer, President of Mathews Company. “While dealers will continue to work with end-users directly to resolve service issues, they overwhelmingly said such videos would be a helpful supplement to the service they are committed to providing their customers,” says Shulfer.
The format of the videos will focus on one specific topic in a 4-6 minute segment, and will include topics such as: setting up and installing M-C Trax (M-C’s remote monitoring system), performing a software update as part of a pre-season check-up and calibrating a moisture sensor. The video tutorials are produced at M-C’s in-house video production studio are managed by Mike Wilke, Director of Engineering and Support Services. “We started with this past season’s most common technical service questions, and created a list of videos that would be most helpful to our dealers and customers. Since we can produce these videos in-house and show quick demonstrations with the equipment, the videos can come together quickly,” says Wilke. M-C plans to release a new video topic each week leading up to the busy fall harvest.
M-C Mark of Excellence Dealer, Troy Low of Agri-Sales in Northwood, Iowa is excited that his customers will be able to view the videos 24 hours a day, 7 days a week not only during the busy harvest time, but also at their leisure when customers are just wanting to learn more about their dryer. “Each year, we get inundated with service calls during harvest, typically when customers are starting their dryers up for the first time of the season,” says Low. “If a customer can view a video tutorial, he will get a detailed, tothe-point answer with a visual demonstration. This will save a lot of time, for us and the customer, which we all know is critical during harvest.”
M-C University OnDemand Video Tutorials can be viewed by visiting http://mathewscompany.com/technical-service/m-c-university-ondemand-training-videos/

 


 

Headquartered in Crystal Lake, IL (U.S.A), Mathews Company has been a leading global manufacturer of high quality innovative agriculture equipment, since 1954, specializing in grain drying.
M-C is committed to “Building for the Future,” striving to provide superior products and unmatched service
through innovation, expertise and quality. M-C dryers are available through authorized dealers worldwide.
The company’s web site is www.mathewscompany.com.

Mathews Company Awarded CSA Certification for New Standards

Mathews Company

Mathews Company

Mathews Company (M-C), a global manufacturer of grain dryers, has been awarded the certification, “CSA Standard for Gas-Fired Equipment for Drying Farm Crops (CSA 3.8-2014)” meeting the new standards for its dryers to operate in Canada. The certification was issued by Intertek, a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL), which is an independent laboratory recognized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), to test product safety standards. In October, 2014, the Standards Council of Canada announced a change in certification standards that impacted M-C grain dryers sold in Canada. The purpose of the standards, according to the Standards Council of Canada, is to “…establish accepted practices, technical requirements and terminologies for products, services and systems…Standards help to ensure better, safer and more efficient methods and products, and are an essential element of technology, innovation and trade.” The council announced that all grain dryers must meet the new CSA Standard for Gas-Fired Equipment for Drying Farm Crops (CSA 3.8- 2014) in order to operate in Canada.

Mathews Company’s engineering team worked diligently with Intertek to obtain this certification so that M-C grain dryers could be sold and installed for the 2015 harvest season. “It was a tight timeline as the certification was a process of schematic reviews and on-site equipment inspections,” says Michael Wilke, Mathews Company’s Director of Engineering and Support Services. According to Wilke, the certification covers four of M-C’s dryer series including the Legacy, Infinity, Trilogy, and its 10’ diameter Modular
Tower Series. Approved dryers will carry the official certification mark, as required by the council, to denote that it is a grain dryer that meets Canadian standards.

Intertek confirmed that Mathews Company is one of the first companies to have met the certification standards. According to Wilke, “What this means for our customers is that they can now accept any one of M-C’s approved grain dryers and put them into operation this fall with the confidence that they are designed and built to meet the required CSA standard and they won’t incur the additional costs of having the dryer field inspected and approved to see if they meet the CSA standard.”


Headquartered in Crystal Lake, IL (U.S.A), Mathews Company has been a leading global manufacturer of
high quality innovative agriculture equipment, since 1954, specializing in grain drying. M-C is committed
to “Building for the Future,” striving to provide superior products and unmatched service through
innovation, expertise and quality. M-C dryers are available through authorised dealers worldwide. The
company’s web site is www.mathewscompany.com.

Top Ten Tips to Dry Produce this Harvest

With most of the worlds grains & cereals harvest already under or just about to begin, the prospect of damp corn coming off of the combine will not appeal to farmers. Some farms use big continuous flow-driers for their produce but more often than not the smaller mobile units are used.

Sturdy as they may be they all need pre-harvest maintenance which is why product manager Angus Steven from Opico teamed up with Farmers Weekly to bring you some helpful-hints in basic maintenance for your machine. However it is always recommended that you have your equipment checked by professionals at least once a year.

The following tips are based on gas-powered GT models:

1.) Burner – The liquified petroleum gas (LPG) used in these models heats up in the dryer and then exits through a series of small holes in a burner ring, which can get blocked. Using a gas nozzle cleaner, a pipe cleaner or even a 5/64in drill-bit you can clean most of the built up residue away. The long-terminal spark plug gap should be 3/32in, if it isn’t and the terminals aren’t encrusted with lots of carbon try giving it a good clean. The silicon-core HT lead can also deteriorate after a few years and sometimes gets gnawed by rodents so check it for damage and replace if necessary.

2) Flame Detector – The flame detector cuts off the fuel supply if the flame goes out. The most likely problem to occur here is the capillary tube involved can sometimes break off, so it’s worth checking for signs of damage. Similarly, there’s an air pressure switch with a pipe attached to it that shouldn’t be blocked.

3) Fan Driveline – This is simply a case of checking the bearings and for any signs of wear and tear on the belt the tension for which should deflect by 1-2in.

4) Agitator – The gearbox oil level should be checked once a year and, if necessary, topped up with EP90 gear oil. The four guide rollers sometimes have a tendency to move over time so just check their allignment within the race turning an eccentric nut which moves them in and out.

5) Bearings – Try to keep the dryer undercover, clean out the bin-well and leave the door open once the drying season is over to protect the bearing at the bottom of the vertical auger which should sit 8-10mm above the bottom of the bin-well.

If you have to replace the bearing, the two rubber seals will need changing at the same time. According to Mr Steven it might seem a pointless exercise, but it is a false economy not to do so. It can mean the difference between the bearing lasting six to seven years rather than just one or two years. A couple (literally) of pumps of grease around the bearing every 100 hours will also prolong its life.

In the same area, the large washer at the bottom should be loose enough to turn if it isn’t you will probably need to check the pressure on your bearings.

6) Discharge Head – If you need to take the discharge head on and off, make sure you grease the stub shaft well and that the flights make up a continuous, undamaged spiral. There should be just a 6mm (0.25in) gap between the ends of the two auger flights.

7) Loading Hopper – Check for grain in the agitator chain drive if there is any it’s coming in too fast. Adjust the volume regulator so that it takes about 15 minutes to load 12t.

8) Augir Drive – Check the tension importantly that there isn’t too much of it, otherwise it can flip over or jump off the pulleys. Again Mr Stevens recommends only using Opico branded belts when replacing.

9) Grain Guard Sensor – Check that the gap on the motion/speed sensors is right, otherwise the electronics will stop the dryer. Beware bridging the contacts as a quick fix.

10)… Farmers Weekly did provide a tenth tip in their original report so for the sake of my own superstitions tip-ten courtesy of IMD is to consult a professional engineer if you haven’t done any of this before!
Happy Harvesting!

www.fwi.co.uk

www.opico.com