EuroTier 2012: Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize

On November 13th 2012, at EUROTIER tradeshow, The European Probiotic Association (EPA) awarded the Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize 2012 to Peter de Schryver, from Ghent University, for his innovative research project on the use of microbial products and microorganisms in animal nutrition. The Prize was awarded in presence of members of the EPA, FEFANA, representative of the EPA Scientific Committee and journalists. Altogether, the quality and diversity of research projects submitted demonstrate that probiotics benefits go beyond zootechnical performance and pave the way for innovative applications in the field of immunity, but also stress management or even reproduction.

From left to right : J. Brufau (EPA Scientific Committee), E. Auclair (EPA Treasurer), P. de Schryver and L. Dussert (EPA President). 

The aim of the EPA Jules Tournut Prize is to support research and innovation in the field of probiotics for animal nutrition. Professor Joaquim Brufau, from IRTA, who represented EPA Scientific Committee, which formed the judging panel of the award, highlighted the scientific quality and diversity of applications explored by the candidates, who came from all over the world, beyond the boundary of Europe. The studies submitted covered a range of target species and benefits, sign of the broad potential of probiotics for sustainable animal production.

Peter de Schryver’s project aimed at improving performance and welfare in aquaculture thanks to an original approach: the use of poly-β- hydroxybutyrate (PHB), which he describes as a microbial energy storage polymer, an important source of energy for bacteria. PHB thus appears to play a prebiotic role in aquatic species, resulting in improved performance and resistance to pathogens. By combining this compound to a probiotic bacteria (synbiotic approach), the young researcher showed that both agents had a synergistic effect to protect fish against pathogens (use of Artemia franciscana as a well-studied model of aquaculture specie).

Nevertheless, when asked if this new approach could be applied to various species Peter de Schryver reckons that “it could certainly work in land farmed animals that have an even more developed digestive system”. The use of PHB in synbiotic approach for animal nutrition thus appears as a promising field.

Moreover, the young researcher is convinced that, especially in aquaculture, the digestive microbiota is often underestimated. Another interesting aspect of his study is that he looked into the Artemia microbiota richness and diversity and found that PHB had a positive effect on the microbiota diversity and evenness, an asset for microflora stability and protection against pathogens

www.engormix.com

The Alltech Poultry Seminar

With high feed costs, increased government regulations and consumer demands intensifying, the future of the poultry industry is difficult to predict. This was the focus of Alltech’s 10th Poultry Solutions Seminar, held in Hannover, Germany on the 12th of November, where a number of distinguished poultry industry experts gave presentations on their cutting edge research and on the issues that they believe will be of most importance.

Antibiotic resistance is getting more and more publicity and governments are starting  to take notice. Dr. Marcel Boereboom, of the Royal Dutch Society for Veterinary Medicine, discussed the impact this is having on the Dutch industry, following a study by the Dutch Health Council. He described how the government of the Netherlands have, to date, banned certain antibiotics and implemented a targeted reduction of 50% (of 2009 levels) of the total amount of antibiotics used in food producing animals by 2013. This has had a huge impact on how poultry is produced.

Focussing on how to deal with this issue was Professor Stephen Collett from the University of Georgia. He recommended a shift in emphasis in gut health management, from working against pathogens, to working with the intestinal microbial community. This involves improving performance by accelerating the evolution and maintaining the stability of favourable intestinal microbiota. The three most important areas of an effective intestinal health management programme include: “seeding” the gut with favourable organisms, “feeding” the favourable organisms and “weeding” out the unfavourable organisms.

Professor Roselina Angel, of the University of Maryland, described to attendees at the Poultry Solutions Seminar research on how neonatal conditioning, resulting in epigenetic changes shows great promise in terms of improving phosphorus (P) utilisation. “By applying a moderate P deficiency in young chicks, the bird is conditioned to utilise P more efficiently throughout its life. The timing of the conditioning is critical and requires a clear understanding of skeletal growth, the main driver of calcium (Ca) and P requirements,” she explained.

Controlling campylobacter, a bacteria that poses no danger to poultry, but is the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, was the topic of Professor Frank Pasmans’ presentation, researched at Ghent University. When a single bird is infected, the infection spreads quickly through the flock, resulting in the majority of birds being colonised within only a few days after Campylobacter entry. He explained how, overall, the outlook is bleak if the flock has been infected but results of recent studies, using oral administration of bovine or chicken immunoglobulins of hyper-immunised animals and the use of bacteriocins to limit caecal colonisation, look promising. “We are still quite a way from commercialised products but the future does seem to be positive,” he explained.

To deal with unpredictable feed costs and an inconsistent supply, Professor David Roland of Auburn University,  recommends his “econometric approach to the feeding of layers. “Feeding correctly is challenging because nutrient requirements and dietary levels needed for optimal returns are continually changing” said Prof. Roland as he opened his talk.

He presented his calculation tool called Econometrics to attendees, demonstrating how optimal econometric feeding can improve performance, returns and help regulate feed and egg prices at the same time.

For a more detailed account of the talks at the Solutions Seminars visit www.alltech.com/blog

Grinding for Feed

Check out this video on the grinding process in the poultry feed production by M. Baumann of Buhler.
By: Marco Baumann

Grinding process in the poultry feed production. M. Baumann (Buhler)

Courtesy of www.engormix.com.

VIV China 2012: Part I

Hello and welcome to the first in a series of post that we will be running this week in response to the recent VIV event that took place in China earlier this month.

VIV China has once again profiled itself as an international platform for products, knowledge and technology for the Chinese animal protein production industry. Following many positive reactions to the event, project manager Ruwan Berculo concluded that the new concept has been a success and can act as a blueprint for the next exhibition.

VIV China 2012 can be summarized as a compact, quality event with high level visitors, a lot of international delegations, people from upcoming economies and a Chinese business audience that is focused on innovation. It marks a huge event in our yearly calendar here at Perendale Publishers and the positive energy surrounding it was infectious.

The enthusiasm and the interest have strengthened our belief that this is a platform that the animal protein industry in China really needs. With congresses, seminars and receptions before, during and after the event that were very well visited, we have presented a networking summit that matters.

Furthermore, the atmosphere was fantastic. The top and sub top of the industry have attended, making the score of 13.874 visitors a very strong result.

Throughout this week we will be talking in more details about elements of the event such as speeches, the exhibitors and who we met there.

The next VIV China is planned for 2014, from 23-25 September.

FEFANA and EPA Join Forces in Probiotics Pursuit

FEFANA and EPA have established a cooperation agreement to collaborate for the promotion of probiotics for animal nutrition. The two associations have recently joined their forces with the aim to generate, develop and share their expertise and information on probiotics with feed chain stakeholders.

FEFANA is the EU Association of Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures while EPA has been created to specifically support the generic promotion of probiotics in feed. Through several initiatives they inform and update the scientific communities, nutritionists and the relevant industries about the benefits of probiotics in animal nutrition.

While FEFANA’s activites are mainly focused on regulatory aspects impacting the specialty feed ingredients industry; this joining of forces will strengthen promotion of probiotics toward the feed chain partners which is a major incentive. The main ambition of this joint group is to better position the probiotics in the national, European and International arena as a pivotal source of information and thanks to combining their activities, this position is strengthened.

The joint group will work on a series of communication activities along the year on topics already identified and related to subjects perceived as important and/or innovative for probiotics information on which you will be able to find on their newly designed website once it has been built. in the near future.

The traditional Jules Tournut Probiotic Prize, created by EPA in 1999, will also be granted in November 2012 during the Eurotier in Hannover, Germany, to reward researchers for their innovative works in the field of probiotics in animal nutrition.

The joint group will operate within the FEFANA structure and make sure that their activities fit to the Specialty Feed Ingredients Industry overall objectives. Gérard Bertin, EPA Secretary General, will take care of the management of this joint group, with support and involvement of the FEFANA staff.

Will you be attending Eurotier 2012? Visit for www.eurotier.com information.

www.fefana.org

asso-epa.com