Alltech’s Mycotoxin Program, 37+, wins innovation award

Alltech has earned a one-star innovation award for its Mycotoxin Management Program, 37+, from INNOV’SPACE, a distinction program that awards new product and service innovations in agriculture. These distinctions are recognized during SPACE, the second largest international agriculture tradeshow in the world, attracting more than 110,000 spectators from 110 countries to Rennes, France, in its 27th edition this September 10 -13, 2013.

Alltech was among 64 INNOV’ SPACE award winners selected this year. An expert panel representing five different categories (machinery, feed, poultry, porcine and ruminate) awarded 14 two-star and 50 one-star distinctions on September 10 at SPACE.

In March this year, Alltech launched its five-point Alltech Mycotoxin Management Program as a response to the increasing threat of molds and mycotoxins on a farmer’s livestock and profitability. Alltech’s expert global mycotoxin management team of researchers and specialized consultants developed a five-point approach to manage the menace of multiple mycotoxins. This five-point approach redefines mycotoxin control and discloses the toxicity of multiple mycotoxins and their effects on animal health and performance.  

“We are very pleased to have been awarded this innovation distinction as we have just launched the 37+ program in France in June. This program is particularly advantageous to the farmer because it can be customized for each farm to identify, manage and control multiple mycotoxins,” said Julien Martin, Alltech general manager for France. “As an INNOV’SPACE award winner, we will be better able to demonstrate the proven results of the 37+ program.”

From left to right: Christophe Tanguy, ruminate sales manager Alltech France, accepts  the Innov’Space Trophy for the 37+  Mycotoxin Management Program from Michel Morin, vice-president of the Brittany region and Guillaume Garot, delegated minister of Agriculture, during the Awards Ceremony at SPACE, the second largest international agriculture tradeshow in the world in Rennes, France.

Alltech’s Mycotoxin Management Program offers key components for farms concerned with mycotoxin contamination:

-The 37+ program analyzes for multiple mycotoxin contamination in a given feed sample.
-The program provides a risk assessment and calculates the risk equivalent quantity (risk factor multiplied by the quantity of mycotoxin) for that particular feedstuff sample.
-The Mycotoxin Hazard Analysis Program (MIKO) from Alltech is designed to help improve production systems on farm and at feed mills by performing an audit; determining the critical control points; and establishing critical limits, monitoring procedures, implementing corrective actions, checking procedures and establishing protocols for recording information.
-The mycotoxin management team provides a complete contamination report and recommendations for management and nutritional applications that can assist with mycotoxin prevention and control. 

“By not using the 37+ test kit, an inaccurate assessment of mycotoxin contamination is more likely. If the farmer has a more complete overview of the mycotoxin problem then they can manage it more effectively, the 37+ test kit allows them to do this” said Emmanuel Landeau, technical manager of monogastric animals. “In addition, the 37+ test kit is easy to use and simplifies what could be considered to be a complicated process. The Mycotoxin Management Program then takes the results of the 37+ analysis, incorporates a variety of different factors such as species and life cycle stage before providing the final report and recommendation to the farmer.”

Alltech will showcase agriculture to a global audience during the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2014 in Normandy from August 23 to September 7, 2014 in Normandy, France.  During the Games, Alltech will host its Global 500 beef and dairy conference, bringing together experts to shape the future of beef and dairy worldwide. Alltech’s passion for agriculture is reflected through its high quality, natural and scientific innovations, like the 37+ Mycotoxin Management Program, for improving efficiency, profitability and sustainability on the farm.
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Vietnam’s Greenfeed is Asia’s no.1

Greenfeed of Vietnam are one of East Asia's up-and-coming feed producers for the livestock industry

Greenfeed of Vietnam is one of East Asia’s up-and-coming feed producers

Animal and aqua feed company Greenfeed of Vietnam was made Asian Feedmiller of the Year at VIV Asia in Bangkok last week. The competition, in its fourth year, is run by the food chemistry multinational Addcon.

As winners Greenfield will receive sponsorship for a trip to VICTAM Ukraine, in Kiev later this year. VICTAM is one of the leading events for the global livestock industry, so this award should allow Greenfeed to propel themselves to bigger and better things.

Addcon CEO and founder Berndt Kochannek congratulated Greenfeed: “We have been proud sponsor of the award ever since it has been initiated in 2009. We believe that [the] award not only helps the winner in getting the reputation they deserve for all their hard work, but it motivates also other feedmills in the region to further improve the quality of their feed.”

“Greenfeed has been awarded the prize for the innovation they have shown in the very competitive market in Vietnam (and Cambodia). The last years, which have been characterized by high raw material costs yet tough competition in the feedmill industry made it clear that only dedicated feedmills will be able to stay in the market. Greenfeed has done great in the past and we think that Greenfeed will do so in the future.”

Runner-up Feedmiller of the Year was the Dabaco Group, also from Vietnam. Anmol Feeds from Bihar, India won the new ‘Emerging Miller’ gong.

The International Milling Directory extends its congratulations to all three companies, and hopes to see them in the pages of the 22nd edition, published this summer.

EuroTier 2012: Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize

On November 13th 2012, at EUROTIER tradeshow, The European Probiotic Association (EPA) awarded the Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize 2012 to Peter de Schryver, from Ghent University, for his innovative research project on the use of microbial products and microorganisms in animal nutrition. The Prize was awarded in presence of members of the EPA, FEFANA, representative of the EPA Scientific Committee and journalists. Altogether, the quality and diversity of research projects submitted demonstrate that probiotics benefits go beyond zootechnical performance and pave the way for innovative applications in the field of immunity, but also stress management or even reproduction.

From left to right : J. Brufau (EPA Scientific Committee), E. Auclair (EPA Treasurer), P. de Schryver and L. Dussert (EPA President). 

The aim of the EPA Jules Tournut Prize is to support research and innovation in the field of probiotics for animal nutrition. Professor Joaquim Brufau, from IRTA, who represented EPA Scientific Committee, which formed the judging panel of the award, highlighted the scientific quality and diversity of applications explored by the candidates, who came from all over the world, beyond the boundary of Europe. The studies submitted covered a range of target species and benefits, sign of the broad potential of probiotics for sustainable animal production.

Peter de Schryver’s project aimed at improving performance and welfare in aquaculture thanks to an original approach: the use of poly-β- hydroxybutyrate (PHB), which he describes as a microbial energy storage polymer, an important source of energy for bacteria. PHB thus appears to play a prebiotic role in aquatic species, resulting in improved performance and resistance to pathogens. By combining this compound to a probiotic bacteria (synbiotic approach), the young researcher showed that both agents had a synergistic effect to protect fish against pathogens (use of Artemia franciscana as a well-studied model of aquaculture specie).

Nevertheless, when asked if this new approach could be applied to various species Peter de Schryver reckons that “it could certainly work in land farmed animals that have an even more developed digestive system”. The use of PHB in synbiotic approach for animal nutrition thus appears as a promising field.

Moreover, the young researcher is convinced that, especially in aquaculture, the digestive microbiota is often underestimated. Another interesting aspect of his study is that he looked into the Artemia microbiota richness and diversity and found that PHB had a positive effect on the microbiota diversity and evenness, an asset for microflora stability and protection against pathogens

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