133.6kg/capita – Setting a global benchmark for feed production — Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert was invited to participate on the recent round of VIV Roadshows, speaking in Abuja, Nigeria at the beginning of January 2014 and more recently at the IPPE’s VIV Pig Production Summit USA. His topic was: ‘The role of a robust compound feed to meet the needs of a growing world population’ and based on survey results from Alltech’s feed survey showing world production in 2013 at 963 million tonnes. 

Roger Gilbert

Roger Gilbert

Looking at production statistics and population figures in isolation does not provide us with a clear view of where we have come from and where we are likely to end up in a world that is being challenged to feed itself adequately.

Static figures do not encourage us to address issues that are looming.
I’m of the view that information is knowledge, knowledge brings responsibility, and together provides us with influence and power to bring about change. If we ‘know’ we have a responsibility to ‘act’.

Nigeria represents one of the few countries on the planet that is adding substantially and significantly to its population base. In the next decade it is projected by the US Census Bureau to add 50 million people to its current 177 million population base and by 2050 challenge the USA for the third most populated country at just under 400 million people! It’s an issue that our industry, and the food industry in general – both in Nigeria and globally – will have to address.

Nigeria is just one example, an extreme one, of what is likely to happen in developing countries over the next 35 years.

However, there is good news for Africa. From the FAO, and surveying the first 12 years of the 21st century, Africa IS increasing its production of foodstuffs faster than anywhere else on the planet. The area being harvested is increasing at twice the rate of that of any other region while two regions – the Americas and Europe – show no increase in area harvested at all.

Product quality is also improving at the fastest rate in this region while yield increases are matching those being achieved in the America and Asia.

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Nigeria population growth

While world food production growth is increasing on average at 2.1 percent per year, Africa is moving ahead at 3.5 percent – and Nigeria is in amongst the countries achieve these higher-than-average increases.

Food consumption per capita based on an index of 2004-06, shows Africa achieving the fastest and most sustained growth rising from 78kg/head to 117kg/head since 1992.

As we are addressing compound feed production it is interesting to see what is happening to the consumption of meat and eggs. Total food supply has doubled in that period to 1.4 million tonnes and per capita consumption of meat up from 7.4kg/head to almost 9kg/head.

That in fact, highlights the next point I wish to make. How can ‘meat’ supply double yet per head consumption rise by less than 20%? The answer is straightforward – population increase. And that is why grams/day consumption of ‘meat’ products (in protein and fat terms) has largely stagnated in Nigeria since 1997.

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Nigeria population growth

By comparison world food supply has also shown a steady upward trend, increasing by almost 1/5th over a 20 year period.

However, in contrast to that, world per capita consumption has fallen from a high of 151kg on average to 146.5kg. No much you might think in terms of total weight, but the additional population over that period is having an impact and we are likely to see this downward trend continue.

And based on consumption per person, the supply of protein in our diets is showing a steady decline as well. On average we are consuming a gram less protein per person per day. Again not significant you might think, but highlights an ongoing tend that can only accelerate.

Fat consumption on the other hand remains relatively unchanged, at between 5.9-6g/head per day. Possibly reflecting the tremendous increase in palm production throughout Asia over recent decades.

Population pyramids

I want to show here how developing country populations are going to increase – again based on figures from the US Census Bureau. I have compared them to the country I live in – the UK – for comparison. You’ll notice that Nigeria has a wider population base compared to the UK (which given the total difference in numbers, is only natural). Also, the UK shows a ‘bulge’ in the 40-60 year olds groups due in part to the baby boomers following the Second World War. What is also evident is the increased number of people living longer in the UK than their counterparts in Nigeria.

As we move ahead through time – to 2030 – the Nigerian population base has widened by an additional 8-10 million births in the 0-4 age group (with a total of 38 million) while the shape of the pyramid remains the same; and with no more people living longer. In the UK on the other hand the population base has remained largely unchanged while even more people are living longer.

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World food supply

Finally, by 2050, the year in which it’s calculated the world will reach 9.5 billion people on the planet, and before stabalising at around 10 billion for the remainder of the century, Nigeria, while maintaining its pyramid shape, will once more see its population base expand, this time adding almost 70 million people in one-to-four year olds!  Again the UK is largely unchanged with a static population base.

These are in general the two key trends that differenciate between today’s developed countries and those ‘developing’.

Global feed production

I’m basing my comments on the latest Alltech Survey 2013 which provides output figures up until December 2013: the most comprehensive available for our industry worldwide and which we should be grateful to have.

The world currently manufacturers annually just under a billion metric tonnes of compounded or formulated animal feed. These feed statistics were collected by 600 Alltech staff from 130 countries involving 28,196 feedmills. Note: Numbers for less developed countries may be less accurate; but that will have little influence on overall dataset.

The top 10 countries in descending order of output are: China, USA, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, India, Russia, Japan, Germany and France which account for 611 million tonnes or two-thirds of world production.

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global feed
production 2013

Poultry, which includes layers, broilers, turkeys and others, account for 444.4 million tonnes of feeds while pigs account for 242.8 million tonnes and ruminants – dairy, beef, calves and others – 195.6 million tonnes.

Key survey findings include:

  • China leading producer at 189 million tons
  • Asia leading overall region with 348 million
  • US and Brazil 2nd and 3rd largest countries
  • Africa fastest growing region; up 7%
  • Middle East has largest feed mills by annual production

Other key findings:

  • Poultry still the leading species
  • 46% of all feed is poultry feed, 61% of that is for broilers
  • 444.4 million tons fed to poultry worldwide
  • Aqua experienced fastest growth up 17% over 2012 – exceeded 40 million tons.
  • Pig feed production increased 11% (esp. China)
  • Pet food up slightly, Equine up 14%
  • Ruminant feed production declined 20%
  • Decline in both Beef and Dairy
  • Able to switch to forages when grain prices high
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Global feed production 2013

The 16 important countries in terms of feed production are ranked in the bar chart above because I want to make the point that countries producing more feed do not necessarily have more feedmills. In fact, this chart is ranked by countries on the left with the least feed mills to the most on the right. And what is really interesting is that the average production from feedmills is not too dissimilar between countries and between regions at 30,000-60,000 tonnes per year.

A developing country’s prospects

Nigeria ranks 54 out of the 133 countries surveyed, in terms of total formulated feed production at 1.9 million tonnes (this does not include home-produced feeds or feeding straights or unformulated feeds). I’d like to extrapolate some figures from the information presented and raise a question or two for you to ponder.

  1. What are the populations of other countries producing a similar amount of feed to Nigeria?
  2. How much feed is being produced by those countries with similar populations?

The reason I ask these questions is that I believe there is a correlation between the volume of compound feed produced in a country and the ability of that country to feed its population adequately.

And I have identified a ‘benchmark’ that I believe all countries need to exceed in order to claim they are providing the nutritional requirements for their populations.

As FAO and other UN organisations, including their associated NGOs, demonstrate safe and affordable food supply is not the responsibility of those with commercial interests alone to fulfill; there is a need for governments to assume responsibility in ensuring food is produced in volumes that are safe and affordable for all.

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Global feed production 2013

Here, I show Nigeria’s total population in 2014 alongside the volume in tonnes of its compound feed production (just under 2 million tonnes). I’ve compared that to other countries producing approximately two million tonnes of compound feed and show here the populations those countries feed.

If my proposal has any substance, then the people of Bosnia will be enjoying a healthy diet of livestock and fish products than their counterparts in Sweden or Czech Republic. Or they are enjoying healthier incomes from export sales.

When comparing Nigeria’s 177 million population of today with similarly populated countries we can compare their compound feed production; it is quickly evident that Nigeria is faring no better than Bangladesh and is a long way behind a country like Brazil.

For every Nigerian to enjoy the ‘world average’ supply of animal proteins based on compound feed, then the Nigerian Feed Industry has to rise to the challenge and lift production from 1.9 million tonnes to 23.6 million tonnes annually: over a 10-fold increase on what it is producing now.
Give our industry a chance

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Top ten countries

I believe that scientifically-formulated compound feeds offer the solution to this world feeding itself adequately by 2050.

We not only have to meet the future needs of humans arriving on the planet, but we also have to meet the needs of those wanting to improve their diets as they become more economically advanced. On top of that we have to address the one billion people FAO tells us are receiving less food than is required to sustain themselves. That figure has not been diminishing, but increasing in recent years.

You may not believe that growing livestock and fish for protein is the way forward however, growing and consuming cereals and crops has not proven to be the complete answer either. Livestock and fish have many advantages in the production of protein for human consumption over grains and cereals (which we cannot go into here) and we should give this industry a chance to prove itself as it offers huge utilization and conversion efficiencies yet to be fully realized.

Unless we measure where we are we cannot set meaningful ‘benchmarks’ for ourselves or our industry for the future.

Alltech’s figures are the first comprehensive figures the industry has on just how much compounded feed is being produced and used. Based on these figures and our current world population, I put it to you that each country must set an annual benchmark that sees every citizen having access to food that is based on 133.6kg/head of scientifically-formulated compound feed.

After all, that’s the world average and every country should be striving to be equal to or rise above the average in terms of supplying safe and affordable food to its people.

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Vietnam’s Greenfeed is Asia’s no.1

Greenfeed of Vietnam are one of East Asia's up-and-coming feed producers for the livestock industry

Greenfeed of Vietnam is one of East Asia’s up-and-coming feed producers

Animal and aqua feed company Greenfeed of Vietnam was made Asian Feedmiller of the Year at VIV Asia in Bangkok last week. The competition, in its fourth year, is run by the food chemistry multinational Addcon.

As winners Greenfield will receive sponsorship for a trip to VICTAM Ukraine, in Kiev later this year. VICTAM is one of the leading events for the global livestock industry, so this award should allow Greenfeed to propel themselves to bigger and better things.

Addcon CEO and founder Berndt Kochannek congratulated Greenfeed: “We have been proud sponsor of the award ever since it has been initiated in 2009. We believe that [the] award not only helps the winner in getting the reputation they deserve for all their hard work, but it motivates also other feedmills in the region to further improve the quality of their feed.”

“Greenfeed has been awarded the prize for the innovation they have shown in the very competitive market in Vietnam (and Cambodia). The last years, which have been characterized by high raw material costs yet tough competition in the feedmill industry made it clear that only dedicated feedmills will be able to stay in the market. Greenfeed has done great in the past and we think that Greenfeed will do so in the future.”

Runner-up Feedmiller of the Year was the Dabaco Group, also from Vietnam. Anmol Feeds from Bihar, India won the new ‘Emerging Miller’ gong.

The International Milling Directory extends its congratulations to all three companies, and hopes to see them in the pages of the 22nd edition, published this summer.

Perendale’s credit at VIV Asia 2013

VIV Asia 2013

VIV Asia 2013

VIV Asia 2013 has been a successful event so far for Perendale Publishers, the International Milling Directory‘s publishing house.

The producers, organisers and staff at VIV Asia have thanked Roger many times for an excellent job chairing CropTech-FeedTech conference yesterday in Bangkok. They want Roger to chair the CropTech-FedTech Russia, India, Latin America and China, said Tuti Tan of Perendale Publishers Ltd.
Tuti continues, “Perendale was mentioned in the opening ceremony too. Gerard from VIV has praised Roger many times. Roger certainly was very happy after the conference. [Plus, participating companies such as] FOSS, Muyang, Wenger and Agentis’ speaker thanked Roger for a good conference”.

Information, updating and registering the International Milling Directory.

 

VIV Asia 2013

The International Milling Directory is proud to be a media partner of VIV Asia, Bangkok as part of the other titles from our owners Perendale Publishers Ltd. One company exhibiting products and their company’s services are ABCA. This is a mainly Chinese-based company who are launching in Asia at this conference. If you are attending VIV Asia 2013, please come to find us at the Perendale Publishers Ltd. stand: Hall 105, stand number B051. It takes place on 13-15 March at BITEC, Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre, 88 Bangna-trad Road, Bangna, Prakanong, Bangkok 10260, Thailand. A recent press release from ABCA is below.

 

ABCA logo

ABCA

Taking advantage of the upcoming VIV Asia 2013, ABCA, a division of AB Agri Ltd, the Agricultural Group of Associated British Foods
plc. (ABF), is delighted to officially announce its launch in Asia with a range of nutritional solutions for the feed and livestock industry. Visit booth K028 for a chance to win a Premier Atlas Ingredients Matrix, your essential guide to feed formulation.

As the region’s leading trade show for the Feed to Meat industry, VIV Asia with over 28,000 visitors from over 101 countries in 2011 of which more than 90% came from Asia, offers an ideal platform for ABCA to launch its yeast-based feed additives to the regional and international feed and livestock industry.

Taking advantage of well established technology within ABF’s food business divisions, ABCA works closely with AB Mauri, the world’s second largest yeast producer and Ohly, the global leader in yeast extraction technology to develop and design applications for a range of effective and innovative animal feed solutions, each produced to food quality standards across Asia and the world.

ABCA will introduce four innovative, functional products during the trade show:

  • AB MOS – Solution for gut health with high levels of MOS and β-glucan, derived from selected baker yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
  • AB Zorba – Cost effective programme for mycotoxin risk management with a   combination of yeast products and aluminosilicates in a balanced ratio.
  • AB Yestex – Ensure animals have a good start with enhanced early nutrition. This is a premium yeast extract rich in highly digestible amino acids, nucleotides, vitamin B complex and other beneficial yeast cell constituents.
  • AB Tor-Sel – A new generation of high potency Selenium yeast obtained from a proprietary strain of Torula yeast produced in Australia.

Speaking about ABCA’s participation in VIV Asia 2013, Mr James Charteris-Hough, ABCA Managing Director, said, “ABCA is new to most people in Asia and while the business seeks to be recognised as a quality supplier of products and services, provided in a highly ethical way, we are not looking to become a mega marketing organisation. We hope we can build a high reputation within the industry in Asia and help deliver long-term benefits through a personable approach to business. Please drop by our booth, we would be delighted to meet people in person.”

For more information, please visit ABCA booth at #K028, Hall 106 or log on to www.abcpasia.com

VIV Asia ABCA

ABCA

Introducing: FineTek

FineTek

Another new member has joined The International Milling Directory.

The Taiwan-based manufacturer is a company dedicated to ‘complete instrumentation solutions’. FineTek’s product line includes a varied and wide quantity of digital controllers and meters, pneumatic products, safety instruments,  level switch transmitters for solid and liquid applications. However all impressive this range of categories are, we are interested most in the manufacture of  the level sensor for silo bulk storage. This product is the key selling point for a justifiable place in the International Milling Directory. This alone is all the more impressive considering their research and development arm is an integral part of the company, which sets a strong “backbone” of the company.

Do see the new listing here at the International Milling Directory online: https://www.internationalmilling.com/company_3940.html

EuroTier 2012: Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize

On November 13th 2012, at EUROTIER tradeshow, The European Probiotic Association (EPA) awarded the Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize 2012 to Peter de Schryver, from Ghent University, for his innovative research project on the use of microbial products and microorganisms in animal nutrition. The Prize was awarded in presence of members of the EPA, FEFANA, representative of the EPA Scientific Committee and journalists. Altogether, the quality and diversity of research projects submitted demonstrate that probiotics benefits go beyond zootechnical performance and pave the way for innovative applications in the field of immunity, but also stress management or even reproduction.

From left to right : J. Brufau (EPA Scientific Committee), E. Auclair (EPA Treasurer), P. de Schryver and L. Dussert (EPA President). 

The aim of the EPA Jules Tournut Prize is to support research and innovation in the field of probiotics for animal nutrition. Professor Joaquim Brufau, from IRTA, who represented EPA Scientific Committee, which formed the judging panel of the award, highlighted the scientific quality and diversity of applications explored by the candidates, who came from all over the world, beyond the boundary of Europe. The studies submitted covered a range of target species and benefits, sign of the broad potential of probiotics for sustainable animal production.

Peter de Schryver’s project aimed at improving performance and welfare in aquaculture thanks to an original approach: the use of poly-β- hydroxybutyrate (PHB), which he describes as a microbial energy storage polymer, an important source of energy for bacteria. PHB thus appears to play a prebiotic role in aquatic species, resulting in improved performance and resistance to pathogens. By combining this compound to a probiotic bacteria (synbiotic approach), the young researcher showed that both agents had a synergistic effect to protect fish against pathogens (use of Artemia franciscana as a well-studied model of aquaculture specie).

Nevertheless, when asked if this new approach could be applied to various species Peter de Schryver reckons that “it could certainly work in land farmed animals that have an even more developed digestive system”. The use of PHB in synbiotic approach for animal nutrition thus appears as a promising field.

Moreover, the young researcher is convinced that, especially in aquaculture, the digestive microbiota is often underestimated. Another interesting aspect of his study is that he looked into the Artemia microbiota richness and diversity and found that PHB had a positive effect on the microbiota diversity and evenness, an asset for microflora stability and protection against pathogens

www.engormix.com

The Alltech Poultry Seminar

With high feed costs, increased government regulations and consumer demands intensifying, the future of the poultry industry is difficult to predict. This was the focus of Alltech’s 10th Poultry Solutions Seminar, held in Hannover, Germany on the 12th of November, where a number of distinguished poultry industry experts gave presentations on their cutting edge research and on the issues that they believe will be of most importance.

Antibiotic resistance is getting more and more publicity and governments are starting  to take notice. Dr. Marcel Boereboom, of the Royal Dutch Society for Veterinary Medicine, discussed the impact this is having on the Dutch industry, following a study by the Dutch Health Council. He described how the government of the Netherlands have, to date, banned certain antibiotics and implemented a targeted reduction of 50% (of 2009 levels) of the total amount of antibiotics used in food producing animals by 2013. This has had a huge impact on how poultry is produced.

Focussing on how to deal with this issue was Professor Stephen Collett from the University of Georgia. He recommended a shift in emphasis in gut health management, from working against pathogens, to working with the intestinal microbial community. This involves improving performance by accelerating the evolution and maintaining the stability of favourable intestinal microbiota. The three most important areas of an effective intestinal health management programme include: “seeding” the gut with favourable organisms, “feeding” the favourable organisms and “weeding” out the unfavourable organisms.

Professor Roselina Angel, of the University of Maryland, described to attendees at the Poultry Solutions Seminar research on how neonatal conditioning, resulting in epigenetic changes shows great promise in terms of improving phosphorus (P) utilisation. “By applying a moderate P deficiency in young chicks, the bird is conditioned to utilise P more efficiently throughout its life. The timing of the conditioning is critical and requires a clear understanding of skeletal growth, the main driver of calcium (Ca) and P requirements,” she explained.

Controlling campylobacter, a bacteria that poses no danger to poultry, but is the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, was the topic of Professor Frank Pasmans’ presentation, researched at Ghent University. When a single bird is infected, the infection spreads quickly through the flock, resulting in the majority of birds being colonised within only a few days after Campylobacter entry. He explained how, overall, the outlook is bleak if the flock has been infected but results of recent studies, using oral administration of bovine or chicken immunoglobulins of hyper-immunised animals and the use of bacteriocins to limit caecal colonisation, look promising. “We are still quite a way from commercialised products but the future does seem to be positive,” he explained.

To deal with unpredictable feed costs and an inconsistent supply, Professor David Roland of Auburn University,  recommends his “econometric approach to the feeding of layers. “Feeding correctly is challenging because nutrient requirements and dietary levels needed for optimal returns are continually changing” said Prof. Roland as he opened his talk.

He presented his calculation tool called Econometrics to attendees, demonstrating how optimal econometric feeding can improve performance, returns and help regulate feed and egg prices at the same time.

For a more detailed account of the talks at the Solutions Seminars visit www.alltech.com/blog

Record Breaking Year for Eurotier 2012

It was a bumper week in Hannover last week (13-16th) as nearly 200,000 animal husbandry farmers & experts and international visitors attended Eurotier 2012.

The worlds largest exhibition of its kind, Eurotier brought together 2,445 direct exhibitors including Perendale Publishers who were media-supporters for the event. Dr. Reinhard Grandke, Chief Executive Officer for Deutsche Landwirtschafts-Gesellschaft (DLG) who organized it announced that, “EuroTier 2012 has reached new record levels,” when speaking to the press in HaNnover at the close of EuroTier on 16 November 2012.

Perhaps more compelling proof of Eurotier’s stature of success this year has to be that half of the 2,445 that exhibited had come from outside of Germany, representing a 40% increase on 2010.  The number of visitors was also up by 10% this year on the previous forum, 160,000 of them went for the latest information and future technology which is crucial to farming in the 21st century.

A stand-alone feature of the new look Eurotier was the unique program addressing feed and animal health which is an essential

Akzo Nobel, were one of the industry leading companies that Darren had the pleasure of meeting.

sector of the industry with around 22% of the IMD being made up of companies who specialize in animal-feed based activities. Perendale Publishers very own International Sales and Marketing Manager, Darren Parris, managed to catch up with some who attended including AB Vista, Norel and Sonac. He said, “I’ve loved meeting up with so many of them with this being my first Eurotier, you get so much more out of meeting people in person and to have everybody under one roof has been fantastic.”

BioEnergy remains a very important subject as we continue to try and source safer and more economical ways of fueling the planet. BioEnergy Decentral reported a constant number of around 42,000 visitors. Despite the current market situation in Germany, the share of international visitors increased by 12% compared with 2010, which is attributable above all to the technology leadership in this industry.

We’ll have more from our Eurotier round-up over the coming days, and work has already begun on planing for the next EuroTier which will be held in Hannover from 11 to 14 November 2014. In the meantime why don’t you tell us your favourite story from the show by commenting on this article, you can also comment on our twitter page @IMD12.

We at Perendale wish to thank everybody that we spoke to throughout the event and look forward to seeing you again soon!

Until next time

Alex Rogers

IMD Coordinator

[slideshow]

Milling executives attend hands-on course at the International Grains Program.

One of IMD‘s biggest companies Buhler have hosted a hands on grains program. Mill owners, directors and managers from around the world traveled to the Inter- national Grains Program Nov. 5-9, 2012 for the Buhler-KSU Executive Milling short course. The course was held at Kansas State University’s International Grains Program and the Hal Ross Flour Mill where 15 participants experienced a hands-on learning opportunity.

The course was led by Tobias Naenny from the Buhler Training Center in Uzwil, Switzerland. Assisting him were two Department of Grain Science and Industry faculty members John Steinfort, Buhler adjunct instructor, and Shawn Thiele, milling operations manager.

In describing the course, Steinfort says, “The course is designed to educate milling executives and non-operation managers on all aspects of the milling process, which will help them to make better business and managerial decisions on a daily basis.”

One participant eager to learn was Luis Villaverde, director of Guatemala operations with Molinos Modernos. Villaverde was grateful for the experts who shared their expertise and the background of milling. He found the information useful as his company begins to expand their wheat mill.
“I was interested in the knowledge and being able to take advantage of the expertise from the people in the business. This course allowed me to better understand the business as a whole,” Villaverde says.

Luis Villaverde Mayo, Molinos Modernso, S.A., Guatemala; Jose Puig, Galletas Puig, Venezuela; and Carlos Puig, Galletas Puig, Venezuela, look at the equipment in the Hal Ross Flour Mill.

Throughout the week participants were in the classroom learning the basics of flour milling and then headed to the mill to apply those principals. From the Hal Ross Flour Mill to the Shellenberger Hall milling laboratory, they had the opportunity to put their skills to the test. These trainings allowed participants to learn about purifiers, milling machinery, proper cleaning procedures and the milling process.

“Going to the mill for workshops was very rich,” Villaverde says. “I have learned about the properties of the grain and the milling process from breaks all the way to getting the flour.”
Not only did the experts teach the participants, but the participants were able to network and learn from each other. Villaverde says he enjoyed exchanging ideas with other participants and seeing how their companies handled situations.

This is just one example of the many partnership trainings offered through IGP. In addition to flour milling and grain processing, IGP offers trainings in the areas of feed manufacturing and grain management, and grain marketing and risk management. For more information about training opportunities at IGP visit the IGP website.

Bosch Packaging Data Revolution

Bosch Packaging Technology has introduced its Mobile Measuring System for capturing relevant data for the analysis of overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). The system enables manufacturers to gain a rapid overview of the OEE of their production lines and serves as a basis for equipment optimization, Bosch said.

The Mobile Measuring System provides the required data on output, speed, downtimes and waste across an entire line and identifies potential for improvement to increase equipment effectiveness and productivity, Bosch reports. If potentials are identified, Bosch determines through competent OEE consulting together with the manufacturer the main causes of the deficiencies and defines steps to address them, the company said.

“Increasing overall equipment effectiveness, and therefore production, is of great significance to our customers. Purchasing OEE measuring systems to identify any potential for improvement can, however, be very expensive and time-consuming,” said Roland Pichler, OEE Consultant, Bosch. “That is why our Mobile Measuring System is an ideal solution for our customers. It can be easily applied for a predetermined period of time and shows potentials for improvement quickly, simply and cost-effectively.”

Learn more at boschpackaging.com.